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d9ac2af0c847b8ea630e627e6ab1f22e1
2010-06-30 05:45:00

Austrian and British researchers, who are working to understand ancient rock engravings from the Copper Age found in many hidden locations throughout Europe, said the displays may have been prehistoric man's primitive version of cinema. The visual displays indicate the artwork was more than simple images, the researchers from Cambridge University and Sankt Poelten's university of applied sciences (FH) in Austria believe. "The cliff engravings... in our opinion are not just pictures but are...

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2010-04-12 09:13:23

Did a change in climate or an extraterrestrial impact bring an end to the beasts and people that roamed the Southwest shortly after the last ice age? A team of researchers from the University of Arizona has revisited evidence pointing to a cataclysmic event thought by many scientists to have wiped out the North American megafauna "“ such as mammoths, saber tooth cats, giant ground sloths and Dire wolves "“ along with the Clovis hunter-gatherer culture some 13,000 years ago. The...

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2009-12-17 14:30:00

University of Calgary archaeologist unearths earliest evidence of modern humans using wild grains and tubers for food The consumption of wild cereals among prehistoric hunters and gatherers appears to be far more ancient than previously thought, according to a University of Calgary archaeologist who has found the oldest example of extensive reliance on cereal and root staples in the diet of early Homo sapiens more than 100,000 years ago. Julio Mercader, holder of the Canada Research Chair in...

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2009-10-30 11:15:36

Researchers ponder whether Internet will produce more financially equal societies A new study reveals the important role inherited wealth plays in sustaining economic inequality in small scale societies. A team of 26 anthropologists, statisticians, and economists based at the Santa Fe Institute in New Mexico amassed an unprecedented data set allowing 43 estimates of a family's wealth inheritance and found that financial inequality among populations largely depends on the "technologies" that...

2009-09-29 10:42:45

A team of Swedish, Danish and British researchers says it used DNA to determine today's Scandinavians are descended from Stone Age immigrants. The researchers said their findings that involve both genetics and archaeology contradict the theory that Scandinavians are descended from the people who came to Scandinavia at the conclusion of the last ice age. The hunter-gatherers who inhabited Scandinavia more than 4,000 years ago had a different gene pool than ours, said Uppsala University...

757e263cbe29ca8582b85baa80da1af41
2009-09-25 04:50:00

Today's Scandinavians are not descended from the people who came to Scandinavia at the conclusion of the last ice age but, apparently, from a population that arrived later, concurrently with the introduction of agriculture. This is one conclusion of a new study straddling the borderline between genetics and archaeology, which involved Swedish researchers and which has now been published in the journal Current Biology. "The hunter-gatherers who inhabited Scandinavia more than 4,000 years ago...

2009-09-04 13:00:24

The ancestors of modern-day Europeans likely were farmers and not hunter-gatherers, British researchers said. DNA analysis taken from burial grounds suggests early farmers migrated into Europe with plants and domesticated animals and replaced Stone Age hunter-gatherers, geneticist Mark Thomas of University College London said in a release Friday. There is little evidence of a genetic link between the hunter-gatherers and the early farmers, said Thomas, who worked with researchers at Germany's...

2009-09-03 23:30:00

Analysis of ancient DNA from skeletons suggests that Europe's first farmers were not the descendants of the people who settled the area after the retreat of the ice sheets. Instead, the early farmers probably migrated into major areas of central and eastern Europe about 7,500 years ago, bringing domesticated plants and animals with them, says Barbara Bramanti from Mainz University in Germany and colleagues. The researchers analyzed DNA from hunter-gatherer and early farmer burials, and...

2009-08-13 12:18:07

A University of Arizona anthropologist has discovered that humans living at a Paleolithic cave site in central Israel between 400,000 and 250,000 years ago were as successful at big-game hunting as were later stone-age hunters at the site, but that the earlier humans shared meat differently."The Lower Paleolithic (earlier) hunters were skilled hunters of large game animals, as were Upper Paleolithic (later) humans at this site," UA anthropology professor Mary C. Stiner said."This might not...

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2009-07-21 07:57:54

University of Oregon-led research team digs up strongest evidence yet for a controversial cosmic event A 17-member team has found what may be the smoking gun of a much-debated proposal that a cosmic impact about 12,900 years ago ripped through North America and drove multiple species into extinction. In a paper appearing online ahead of regular publication in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, University of Oregon archaeologist Douglas J. Kennett and colleagues from nine...


Latest Stone Age Reference Libraries

Homo sapiens idaltu
2013-09-24 12:20:45

Homo sapiens idaltu is an extinct subspecies of Homo sapiens that lived nearly 160,000 years ago during the Pleistocene in Africa. “Idaltu” comes from the Saho-Afar word meaning “elder” or “first born”. The fossilized remains of H. s. idaltu were uncovered at Herto Bouri near the Middle Awash site of Ethiopia’s Afar Triangle in the year 1997 by Tim White, but were first revealed in 2003. Herto Bouri is a portion of Ethiopia under volcanic layers. By using radioisotope dating,...

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Word of the Day
mundungus
  • A stinking tobacco.
  • Offal; waste animal product; organic matter unfit for consumption.
This word comes from the Spanish 'mondongo,' tripe, entrails.