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Non-Dominant Hand Vital To Evolution Of The Thumb

Non-Dominant Hand Vital To Evolution Of The Thumb

Gary Hughes, The University of Kent Research shows non-dominant hand is likely to have played a vital role in the evolution of modern human hand morphology. In the largest experiment ever undertaken into the manipulative pressures...

Latest stone tool Stories

Ancient Syrians Chose Buying Local Instead Of Importing
2013-10-16 15:02:48

University of Sheffield An archaeologist at the University of Sheffield has found evidence that, contrary to a widely held theory, ancient Syrians made their stone tools locally instead of importing finished tools from Turkey. The discovery, newly published online in Journal of Archaeological Science, has implications for our understanding of how early cities developed in these regions and how the geographic origins of raw materials affect developing states. During the Early Bronze...

Neanderthal Tools Cultural Differences
2013-08-19 16:17:52

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new analysis from an archeologist at the University of Southampton in the United Kingdom has revealed distinct cultural differences between two groups of Neanderthals based on the divergent design of stone tools between 115,000 and 35,000 years ago. According to a study by researcher Karen Ruebens, the differences point to a more complex Neanderthal culture than what was previously suspected. "In Germany and France there appears to...

Researchers Study Earliest Evidence Of Human Hunting And Scavenging
2013-05-11 08:19:44

April Flowers for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online New light has been shed on the diet and food acquisition strategies of some of the earliest human ancestors in Africa, according to a new study led by Baylor University. Early tool making humans, known as Oldowan hominin, started to exhibit a number of physiological and ecological adaptations beginning around two million years ago. These adaptations, including an increase in brain and body size, heavier investment in their...

2010-11-04 13:43:44

Stone Age humans were only able to develop relatively advanced tools after their brains evolved a greater capacity for complex thought Stone Age humans were only able to develop relatively advanced tools after their brains evolved a greater capacity for complex thought, according to a new study that investigates why it took early humans almost two million years to move from razor-sharp stones to a hand-held stone axe. Researchers used computer modelling and tiny sensors embedded in...

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2010-11-04 10:11:20

Was it the evolution of the hand, or of the brain, that enabled prehistoric toolmakers to make the leap from simple flakes of rock to a sophisticated hand axe? A new study finds that the ability to plan complex tasks was key. The research, published today in the Public Library of Science journal PLoS ONE, is the first to use a cyber data glove to precisely measure the hand movements of stone tool making, and compare the results to brain activation. "Making a hand axe appears to require...

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2010-10-29 07:04:00

Researchers have discovered the oldest evidence to date that prehistoric humans in southern Africa had mastered a complex, delicate process to sharpen stones into spears and knives at least 75,000 years ago, more than 50,000 years earlier than previously believed, according to a study published Thursday. The technique, known as pressure flaking, took place at Blombos Cave in modern day South Africa during the Middle Stone Age by anatomically modern humans, and involved the heating of silcrete...

2009-06-25 12:46:55

U.S. archaeologists are using obsidian flakes left from the carving of tools to answer many questions about early human beings. University of Washington and Smithsonian Institute archaeologists used X-ray fluorescence spectrometers to determine the origin of 131 flakes of obsidian, a volcanic glass, found at 18 sites on eight islands in the Kurils. The flakes were found with other artifacts and dated to 2,500 to 750 years ago. The Kuril Archipelago stretches nearly 800 miles between the...


Word of the Day
grass-comber
  • A landsman who is making his first voyage at sea; a novice who enters naval service from rural life.
According to the OED, a grass-comber is also 'a sailor's term for one who has been a farm-labourer.'