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Latest Streptomycin Stories

2013-01-28 13:52:49

Vanderbilt biochemists have discovered that the process bacteria undergo when they become drug resistant can act as a powerful tool for drug discovery. Their findings — reported this week in the Online Early Edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences — should give a major boost to natural products drug discovery — the process of finding new drugs from compounds isolated from living organisms — by substantially increasing the number of novel...

2012-11-05 00:21:21

WASHINGTON, Nov. 5, 2012 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Following is the daily "Profile America" feature from the U.S. Census Bureau: (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20110428/DC91889LOGO) MONDAY, NOVEMBER 5: FIRST U.S. ANTIBIOTIC Profile America -- Monday, November 5th. This year's Nobel prizes were announced last month, and the award ceremonies will be held in Stockholm, Sweden and Oslo, Norway next month. In 1952, the prize for medicine was awarded for the discovery of...

2011-12-01 19:02:12

Study 'intensely personal' for OHSU researcher, whose deafness was caused by antibiotics Peter Steyger's research on hearing is very personal. That's because Steyger – a research scientist with the Oregon Hearing Research Center at Oregon Health & Science University – is deaf. Now Steyger has published groundbreaking research that is as personal as it gets. The study gives scientists new insight into why a specific class of antibiotics causes deafness – the same...

2011-11-03 23:01:00

WASHINGTON, Nov. 4, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Following is the daily "Profile America" feature from the U.S. Census Bureau: (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20110428/DC91889LOGO) FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4: FIRST ANTIBIOTIC Profile America -- Friday, November 4th. The Nobel prizes, named in honor of Alfred Nobel, were first awarded in 1901. This year's prize winners were announced last month, and the award ceremonies will be held in Stockholm, Sweden and Oslo, Norway next month....

2011-01-26 12:21:48

Superbugs are not just a problem in hospitals but could be also coming from our animal farms. Research published in BioMed Central's open access journal BMC Microbiology indicates insects could be responsible for spreading antibiotic resistant bacteria from pigs to humans. Ludek Zurek and collaborators from Kansas and North Carolina State Universities isolated bacteria from farm pig feces and compared them to the bacteria present in the intestines of the house flies and German cockroaches...

2010-11-29 14:30:43

A team of researchers from Spain and Latin America have synthesized two iron compounds that inhibit the in vitro growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacteria that causes tuberculosis. Due their low level of toxicity in mammel cells, the compounds could be used in the future as therapeutic agents and hospital disinfectants. A group of researchers from the Universidad de Navarra (Spain), the Universidad de la República (Uruguay), the Universidad de...

2007-05-30 12:00:12

By Brian Knowlton Public health officials on Tuesday urged the passengers and crew of two recent trans-Atlantic flights to get checked for tuberculosis, after learning that a man with an exceptionally drug- resistant form of the disease had flown on the planes. The man, an American who was not identified, flew on May 12 from Atlanta to Paris aboard Air France Flight 385, then traveled on May 24 from Prague to Montreal aboard Czech Air Flight 410 before driving back to the United States, the...

2006-01-19 14:21:47

By Maggie Fox, Health and Science Correspondent WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Bacteria in dirt may be "born" with a resistance to antibiotics, which could help shed light on the problem of drug-defying "superbugs," Canadian researchers said on Thursday. They tested 480 different bacteria found in soil and discovered that every single one had some resistance to antibiotics -- meaning they had evolved a mechanism for evading the effects of the drugs. The findings, published in the journal...

2006-01-19 14:20:00

By Maggie Fox, Health and Science Correspondent WASHINGTON -- Bacteria in dirt may be "born" with a resistance to antibiotics, which could help shed light on the problem of drug-defying "superbugs," Canadian researchers said on Thursday. They tested 480 different bacteria found in soil and discovered that every single one had some resistance to antibiotics -- meaning they had evolved a mechanism for evading the effects of the drugs. The findings, published in the journal Science, could help...