Quantcast

Latest Stress and immune system Stories

Yes, Stress Can Make You Sick. But How?
2012-04-03 07:47:02

Researchers, led by Sheldon Cohen, at Carnegie Mellon University have discovered that psychological stress increases risk for depression, heart disease and infectious diseases. And now they know how. The researchers found that psychological stress causes the body to lose its ability to regulate the inflammatory response. According to Cohen, “Inflammation is partly regulated by the hormone cortisol and when cortisol is not allowed to serve this function, inflammation can get out of...

2011-03-24 14:32:36

Psychological distress and risk of long term disability: population based longitudinal study Even relatively mild stress can lead to long term disability and an inability to work, reveals a large population based study published online in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health. It is well known that mental health problems are associated with long term disability, but the impact of milder forms of psychological stress is likely to have been underestimated, say the authors. Between...

2010-07-15 16:57:00

OKLAHOMA CITY, July 15 /PRNewswire/ -- Imagine feeling great all the time; never feeling run down and never having to take a week off from the gym to recover from strain or injury. This isn't a utopian vision of some far-off future - this is reality for the tens of thousands who have discovered the first and only health food that balances the body's immune system naturally: i26 by Legacy for Life. The $50 Million Egg And The Million Dollar Question: How Does It Work? Our immune systems...

2009-07-21 08:40:36

Whether it's getting a cold during exam time or feeling run-down after a big meeting, we've all experienced feeling sick following a particularly stressful time at work or school. Is this merely coincidence, or is it possible that stress can actually make us sick? In a new report in Perspectives on Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, psychologist Janice K. Kiecolt-Glaser from the Ohio State University College of Medicine reviews research...

2009-04-21 14:19:54

Study finds link between exposure to community violence and a disruption to the stress pathways in the body School-aged children who witness violence in urban communities show symptoms of post-traumatic stress. They also suffer physiological effects with a disruption to their normal cortisol production pattern during the day, which may have long-term negative effects on their health. According to Dr. Shakira Franco Suglia, from the Harvard School of Public Health, and her team lead by Dr....

2009-03-11 11:12:51

U.S. biochemists say they've identified a new pathway that controls the activity of a protein involved in inflammation regulation. University of Illinois Professor Lin-Feng Chen and colleagues said their findings could have important implications for the treatment of diseases or conditions linked to chronic inflammation. The researchers said they have deciphered a molecular code that controls the function of a protein complex called NF-kappa B that is involved in a cell's inflammatory...

2009-02-17 21:26:55

Raising a child with a disability causes more daily stress and long-range health problems than parenting a child without disabilities, U.S. researchers say. Stress and health ills were greater among parents of disabled children, U.S. researchers found. The study, published in the Journal of Health and Social Behavior, found parents who had children with disabilities -- that included attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and bipolar disorder -- reported having at least one stressor on 50...

2007-08-18 00:22:00

Chronic stress can aggravate neurodegenerative diseases such as multiple sclerosis and other inflammatory diseases, U.S. researchers said. A study by scientists at Texas A&M University, presented at the 115th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association, said stress-related increases in central nervous system inflammation are behind the adverse effects of stress in an animal model of MS. The study suggests that stress-induced increases of pro-inflammatory cytokines --...

2005-11-16 13:07:00

By Amy Norton NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Simply thinking about something personally meaningful can ease some of the physiological effects of stress, a new study suggests. In an experiment with college students asked to perform a stressful task, researchers found that those who first reflected on some important personal values -- whatever they were -- showed lower levels of a stress-hormone while they were under pressure. The findings are the first to show that such self-reflection...


Word of the Day
humgruffin
  • A terrible or repulsive person.
Regarding the etymology of 'humgruffin,' the OED says (rather unhelpfully) that it's a 'made-up word.' We might guess that 'hum' comes from 'humbug' or possibly 'hum' meaning 'a disagreeable smell,' while 'gruffin' could be a combination of 'gruff' and 'griffin.'