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Latest Structure of the Earth Stories

mercury magnetic field
2014-08-01 03:45:58

Stuart Wolpert, University of California - Los Angeles Earth and Mercury are both rocky planets with iron cores, but Mercury's interior differs from Earth's in a way that explains why the planet has such a bizarre magnetic field, UCLA planetary physicists and colleagues report. Measurements from NASA's Messenger spacecraft have revealed that Mercury's magnetic field is approximately three times stronger at its northern hemisphere than its southern one. In the current research,...

2014-06-16 09:57:20

European Association of Geochemistry Two studies show that the movement rate of plates carrying the Earth's crust may not be constant over time. This could provide a new explanation for the patterns observed in the speed of evolution and has implications for the interpretation of climate models. The work is presented today at Goldschmidt 2014, the premier geochemistry conference taking place in Sacramento, California, USA. The Earth's continental crust can be thought of as an archive...

An Ocean's Worth Of Water May Be Sitting In North American Mantle
2014-06-13 10:28:29

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online While all of Earth’s oceans may seem like more than enough water for one planet, a new study published in the journal Science has revealed an ocean’s worth of water may be sitting in the mantle, hundreds of miles below North America. According to the study, molecular water is stored away in a mineral called ringwoodite about 400 miles below the Earth’s surface. The study team said this stored water is sitting in a transition...

Ancient Rocks Provide Clues About Earth's Earliest Crust
2014-05-30 03:14:31

By Bryan Alary, University of Alberta PhD student's studies of four-billion-year-old rocks show ancient crust generated in an Iceland-like setting. It looks like just another rock, but what Jesse Reimink holds in his hands is a four-billion-year-old chunk of an ancient protocontinent that holds clues about how the Earth’s first continents formed. The University of Alberta geochemistry student spent the better part of three years collecting and studying ancient rock samples from...

2014-05-23 13:27:42

Carnegie Institution Breaking research news from a team of scientists led by Carnegie's Ho-kwang "Dave" Mao reveals that the composition of the Earth's lower mantle may be significantly different than previously thought. These results are to be published by Science. The lower mantle comprises 55 percent of the planet by volume and extends from 670 and 2900 kilometers in depth, as defined by the so-called transition zone (top) and the core-mantle boundary (below). Pressures in the lower...

Earth core structure shutterstock_179800859
2014-04-05 06:41:23

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The contours of the Earth's crust are influenced by the high temperatures deep within the Earth's mantle, according to a new study published in Science. A team of researchers, led by Brown University, demonstrated that those temperature differences control the elevation and volcanic activity along mid-ocean ridges, the colossal mountain ranges that line the ocean floor. Forming at the boundaries of tectonic plates, mid-ocean ridges...

Researchers Develop New Model Of Earth's Dynamic Interior
2014-03-31 14:24:13

[ Watch The Video: Researchers Develop New Model Of Earth’s Dynamic Interior ] Nikki Cassis, Arizona State University Seeking to better understand the composition of the lowermost part of Earth’s mantle, located nearly 2,900 kilometers (1,800 miles) below the surface, a team of Arizona State University researchers has developed new simulations that depict the dynamics of deep Earth. A paper published March 30 in Nature Geoscience reports the team’s findings, which could be...

ringwoodite
2014-03-13 07:33:12

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The first terrestrial sample of a water-rich gem that reveals new evidence about the existence of large volumes of water has been discovered by an international team of scientists which was led by University of Alberta's diamond scientist, Graham Pearson. Analysis of the gem, called ringwoodite, reveals that it contains a significant amount of water — 1.5 percent of its own weight. These findings, reported in a recent issue of...

earthquake
2014-03-05 04:54:55

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study published in the journal Science reveals new information about the forces behind earthquakes. Geoscientists from the University of California, Los Angeles used a technique known as seismic tomography to study the structure of the Pacific Plate. This technique helped the team determine the plate’s thickness and image the interior of the plate and the underlying mantle, which they were able to relate to the direction of...

Oceans Earths Mantle
2014-01-27 13:52:44

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online University of Liverpool scientists believe that up to three and a half times the water of all the Earth’s oceans could be being transported beneath our feet. Seismologists reported in the journal Geology that they found deep sea fault zones could transport much larger amounts of water from Earth’s oceans to the upper mantle than previously thought. The team analyzed earthquakes that occurred more than 60 miles below the Earth’s...


Latest Structure of the Earth Reference Libraries

Seismology
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Seismology is the scientific study of earthquakes and the spread of elastic waves through the Earth or through other planet-like bodies. The field includes studies of earthquake effects, such as tsunamis in addition to diverse seismic sources such as tectonic, volcanic, oceanic, atmospheric, and artificial processes. A related field that utilizes geology to infer information regarding past earthquakes is paleoseismology. A recording of earth motion as a function of time is a seismogram. A...

0_a4a5653b4a287158357a3d5b37b58d01
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Earth science (or geoscience) is the science of the planet Earth. Earth science can be broken down into four major disciplines, which are: geography, geology, geophysics, and geodesy. These disciplines use physics, chemistry, biology, chronology and mathematics to arrive to a greater understanding of the principal areas of the Earth system. Since Earth is the only known life-bearing planet, Earth science is solely dedicated to the geophysical makeup of our own planet. One discipline,...

6_914a7fcc557496313161b2da1b718dea2
2004-10-19 04:45:41

Meteorite -- A meteorite is a relatively small extraterrestrial material body that reaches the Earth's surface. While in space these bodies are called meteoroids. Upon entering the atmosphere air drag and friction will cause the body to heat up, emitting light, thus forming a meteor, fireball, or shooting star. Most meteors disintegrate in the air, making impact events (Earth impacts) on the surface of Earth uncommon. About 500 baseball sized rocks a year reach the surface. Large...

4_33609f8ebef994f54be143abe0bef9f42
2004-10-19 04:45:40

Earth -- in geology and astronomy, fifth largest planet of the solar system and the only planet definitely known to support life. Gravitational forces have molded the earth, like all celestial bodies, into a spherical shape. However, the earth is not an exact sphere, being slightly flattened at the poles and bulging at the equator. The equatorial diameter is c.7,926 mi (12,760 km) and the polar diameter 7,900 mi (12,720 km); the circumference at the equator is c.24,830 mi (40,000 km)....

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Word of the Day
monteith
  • A large punch-bowl of the eighteenth century, usually of silver and with a movable rim, and decorated with flutings and a scalloped edge. It was also used for cooling and carrying wine-glasses.
  • A kind of cotton handkerchief having white spots on a colored ground, the spots being produced by a chemical which discharges the color.
This word is possibly named after Monteith (Monteigh), 'an eccentric 17th-century Scotsman who wore a cloak scalloped at the hem.'
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