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Latest Structure of the Earth Stories

Source Of Galapagos Volcano
2014-01-21 14:35:32

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new analysis from a team of American researchers has found the volcanic plume that created the Galapagos Islands isn’t where models have projected it. The study team said their findings could also explain volcanic activity around the islands. According to the study, which was published on Sunday the journal Nature Geoscience, the Galapagos plume is at a depth of 155 miles, approximately 100 miles southeast of the westernmost island...

Molten Rock Support Atlas Mountains In Morocco
2014-01-03 04:28:44

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The standard model for mountain structure, in which high topography must have deep roots for support, is defied by the Atlas Mountains, according to a new study from the Earth Sciences department at the University of Southern California (USC). The team of scientists created a new model which reveals that the Atlas Mountains are floating on a layer of hot molten rock flowing beneath the lithosphere — the Earth's most rigid outer...

Dense Earth Crust Was Recycled Into The Mantle During Archean Eon
2013-12-31 07:31:36

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online The temperature of the Earth’s mantle during the Archean eon some four billion years ago was significantly higher than it is today, causing the crust to become unstable and drip back down into the mantle, according to research published this month in Nature Geoscience. As part of the study, Dr. Tim Johnson of the Institute of Geosciences at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and his colleagues created model calculations...

Geoscientist Leads International Drilling Mission To Lower Crust Of Pacific
2013-12-04 11:33:49

University of Houston A University of Houston (UH) geoscientist and his colleagues are revealing new discoveries about the Earth's development, following a major international expedition that recovered the first-ever drill core from the lower crust of the Pacific Ocean. Co-chief scientists Jonathan Snow from UH and Kathryn Gillis from University of Victoria in Canada led a team of 30 researchers from around the world on the $10 million expedition, finding a few surprises upon...

Antarctic Volcano Seamounts Present Many Riddles To Volcanologists
2013-10-18 05:20:11

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online When you think of the Antarctic, images of snow, ice and glaciers are the usual associations. We forget that it is also a region of fire, dotted with volcanoes on the mainland and the surrounding islands. Some of these volcanoes are extinct and some are still active, such as the Marie Byrd Seamounts in the Amundsen Sea. Today, their summit plateaus are at depths of 7,800 - 5,200 feet, making them difficult to reach with conventional...

2013-10-11 11:45:29

The iron in the Earth's inner core weakens dramatically before it melts, explaining the unusual properties that exist in the moon-sized solid centre of our planet that have, up until now, been difficult to understand. Scientists use seismic waves - pulses of energy generated during earthquakes - to measure what is happening in the Earth's inner core, which at 6000 km beneath our feet is completely inaccessible. Problematically for researchers, the results of seismic measurements...

New Evidence Gives New Life To ‘Percolation’ Theory For Earth’s Core
2013-10-08 17:23:32

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com – Your Universe Online Scientists writing in the journal Nature Geoscience say that a similar process to that which allows water to yank oils from ground coffee  in order to make a cup of joe in the morning, could be how the Earth's core formed. Stanford University scientists recreated the intense pressures and temperatures inside Earth and found that an iron melt network may have helped grow the Earth's core. The finding revisits a theory first proposed...

Scientists Document Scavenging For Oxygen In Seawater Circulating Through Deep Oceanic Crust
2013-09-27 11:16:26

Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences Although long thought to be devoid of life, the bottom of the deep ocean is now known to harbor entire ecosystems teeming with microbes. Scientists have recently documented that oxygen is disappearing from seawater circulating through deep oceanic crust, a significant first step in understanding the way life in the "deep biosphere" beneath the sea floor is able to survive and thrive. The new research findings were published in the journal Nature...

2013-09-24 13:34:49

Scientists broke new ground in the study of deep earthquakes, a poorly understood phenomenon that occurs where the oceanic lithosphere, driven by tectonics, plunges under continental plates – examples are off the coasts of the western United States, Russia and Japan. This research is a large step toward replicating the full power of these earthquakes to learn what sets them off and how they unleash their violence. It was made possible only by the construction of a one-of-a-kind X-ray...

Researchers May Have Solved The Spin Mystery Of Earth's Core
2013-09-17 06:18:52

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online For the last 300 years at least, we have been questioning what direction the center of the earth spins. A group of scientists from the University of Leeds, UK, and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology may have found the answer. According to the study, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), the Earth's inner core - made of solid iron - "superrotates" in eastward directions. This means it spins faster...


Latest Structure of the Earth Reference Libraries

Seismology
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Seismology is the scientific study of earthquakes and the spread of elastic waves through the Earth or through other planet-like bodies. The field includes studies of earthquake effects, such as tsunamis in addition to diverse seismic sources such as tectonic, volcanic, oceanic, atmospheric, and artificial processes. A related field that utilizes geology to infer information regarding past earthquakes is paleoseismology. A recording of earth motion as a function of time is a seismogram. A...

0_a4a5653b4a287158357a3d5b37b58d01
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Earth science (or geoscience) is the science of the planet Earth. Earth science can be broken down into four major disciplines, which are: geography, geology, geophysics, and geodesy. These disciplines use physics, chemistry, biology, chronology and mathematics to arrive to a greater understanding of the principal areas of the Earth system. Since Earth is the only known life-bearing planet, Earth science is solely dedicated to the geophysical makeup of our own planet. One discipline,...

6_914a7fcc557496313161b2da1b718dea2
2004-10-19 04:45:41

Meteorite -- A meteorite is a relatively small extraterrestrial material body that reaches the Earth's surface. While in space these bodies are called meteoroids. Upon entering the atmosphere air drag and friction will cause the body to heat up, emitting light, thus forming a meteor, fireball, or shooting star. Most meteors disintegrate in the air, making impact events (Earth impacts) on the surface of Earth uncommon. About 500 baseball sized rocks a year reach the surface. Large...

4_33609f8ebef994f54be143abe0bef9f42
2004-10-19 04:45:40

Earth -- in geology and astronomy, fifth largest planet of the solar system and the only planet definitely known to support life. Gravitational forces have molded the earth, like all celestial bodies, into a spherical shape. However, the earth is not an exact sphere, being slightly flattened at the poles and bulging at the equator. The equatorial diameter is c.7,926 mi (12,760 km) and the polar diameter 7,900 mi (12,720 km); the circumference at the equator is c.24,830 mi (40,000 km)....

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Word of the Day
tesla
  • The unit of magnetic flux density in the International System of Units, equal to the magnitude of the magnetic field vector necessary to produce a force of one newton on a charge of one coulomb moving perpendicular to the direction of the magnetic field vector with a velocity of one meter per second. It is equivalent to one weber per square meter.
This word is named for Nikola Tesla, the inventor, engineer, and futurist.