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Latest Sub-replacement fertility Stories

Economic Factors Have Greatest Impact On Fertility Rates
2013-05-01 08:56:09

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Economic factors, rather than medical or cultural influences, will have the greatest impact on global population levels over the next decade, according to a recent University of Missouri College of Arts and Science (COAS) study. According to United Nations figures, the Earth´s population could exceed 8 billion people by the year 2023 if current trends continue. But improvements in economic development, such as higher...

2012-10-03 10:35:37

Children in smaller families are only slightly more likely to survive childhood in high mortality environments, according to a new study of mothers and children in sub-Saharan Africa seeking to understand why women, even in the highest fertility populations in world, rarely give birth to more than eight children. The study by Dr David Lawson and Dr Alex Alvergne from UCL Anthropology, and Dr Mhairi Gibson from the University of Bristol, challenges the popular theory proposed by...

2009-08-05 16:12:02

As wealth increases in developing nations, fertility declines until a high level of economic development is reached, U.S. researchers said Wednesday. The rise in an aging population globally accompanied with a drop in birth rates has lead to socioeconomic concerns on matters such as workforce maintenance, University of Pennsylvania researchers reported in Nature. The related rise and fall led leaders in developed and developing countries to express concerns that population decreases would...

2009-08-05 14:08:21

A team of researchers at the University of Pennsylvania and the Università Bocconi in Milan have released a study that challenges one of the most established and accepted standards in the social sciences: Human fertility levels tend to decline as countries advance towards high levels of social and economic development.The researchers question the conventional wisdom by documenting new findings, potentially relevant to discussions of economic and social policy, of a reversal...

2008-08-19 06:10:00

By Janet Kornblum The number of women ages 40 to 44 who remain childless has doubled in a generation, the U.S. Census reported Monday. In June 2006, 20% of women in that age group remained childless. Thirty years ago it was 10%. "A lot of women are having no children," Jane Lawler Dye, the author of the report, says. "Also, the women who are having children are having fewer children." Birth rates for non-Hispanic white women, at 1.9 per woman, continue to remain lower than the rate that...

2006-04-26 07:25:00

By Anna Willard PARIS -- Beatrice Riobe has played her part in giving France the second highest birth rate in Europe. Riobe has nine children aged 4 to 19: her case is rare and this year the government honored her with a special gold medal awarded annually to successful large families. Experts say France's high birth rate -- women have an average of 1.9 children -- is probably due to the government's long-term policy of rewarding those who have children, offering medals, financial incentives...

2006-04-13 05:10:00

TOKYO -- Alarmed by its sliding birth rate and rapidly aging population, Japan is hoping the prospect of lower shopping bills will encourage couples to go for bigger families. The government is considering issuing identity cards to families with children which would give discounts at stores cooperating with the program, the Yomiuri Shimbun daily said on Thursday. The size of the discounts would be decided by the stores, which would also be expected to fund the system in return for favorable...


Word of the Day
virgule
  • A punctuation mark (/) used to separate related items of information.
  • A little rod; a twig.
This word comes from the Late Latin 'virgula,' accentual mark, a diminutive of 'virga,' rod.
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