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Latest Subaru Stories

2013-12-06 23:20:35

New Club Car Utility Vehicles Feature Subaru EFI Engines, Fool-proof Charging, and Fit-to-task Bed Boxes to Boost Power, Reliability and Versatility Augusta, GA (PRWEB) December 06, 2013 Club Car is launching a new line of Carryall® utility and transport vehicles to help commercial and industrial customers switch from costly pickup trucks to gas, diesel or zero-emissions electric utility vehicles (UTVS). The new vehicles will be available in January 2014. “We designed and...


Latest Subaru Reference Libraries

Saker GT
2014-02-01 08:44:08

Saker Sports Cars is an automobile manufacturer based in New Zealand, founded in 1989. The company’s name comes from a bird of prey that is found in the Middle East and Central Asia. The first Saker, the SV1, was designed and built by Bruce Turnbull. Saker vehicles are built as touring race cars, but can be made legal for the road in the UK, Japan and New Zealand. The SV1 was built in a limited number. It had a steel space-frame chassis, a fiberglass body, used a variety of V-6 and...

Subaru Telescope
2004-10-19 04:45:40

Image Caption: The Subaru Telescope at the Mauna Kea Observatory on Hawaii. Credit: Denys/Wikipedia (CC BY-SA 3.0) The Subaru Telescope is a 26.9-foot (8.2m) telescope located at the Mauna Kea Observatory on the Big Island of Hawaii and operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ). It had the largest primary mirror in the world until 2005. This is a reflecting telescope with a large field of view--called a Ritchey-Chretien--which has a primary mirror and a secondary...

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Word of the Day
vermicular
  • Like a worm in form or movement; vermiform; tortuous or sinuous; also, writhing or wriggling.
  • Like the track or trace of a worm; appearing as if worm-eaten; vermiculate.
  • Marked with fine, close-set, wavy or tortuous lines of color; vermiculated.
  • A form of rusticated masonry which is so wrought as to appear thickly indented with worm-tracks.
This word ultimately comes from the Latin 'vermis,' worm.
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