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Latest Sugars in wine Stories

2011-07-28 17:41:14

Researchers at Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona have developed an electronic tongue which can identify different types of cava wines, thanks to a combination of sensor systems and advanced mathematical procedures. The device automatically produces classifications similar to those of a sommelier. Cava varies in type according to the amount of sugar added with the expedition liqueur after secondary fermentation (which produces carbonic gas). Therefore it is useful to know the exact amount of...

2011-07-25 23:35:08

For thousands of years, bakers and brewers have relied on yeast to convert sugar into alcohol and carbon dioxide. Yet, University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers eager to harness this talent for brewing biofuels have found when it comes to churning through sugars, these budding microbes can be picky eaters. Published online this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center team identified several new genes that improve yeast's ability...

2011-03-09 08:37:32

(Ivanhoe Newswire) "“ Why do we constantly crave that chocolate or those sweet tarts? Scientists have discovered that taste cells have several addition sugar detectors on top of the previously known sweet receptor. This could be a key step in developing strategies to limit overconsumption, according to this study. "Detecting the sweetness of nutritive sugars is one of the most important tasks of our taste cells," senior author Robert F. Margolskee, M.D., Ph.D., a molecular...

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2011-03-08 11:37:06

Multiple taste cell sensors contribute to detecting sugars A new research study dramatically increases knowledge of how taste cells detect sugars, a key step in developing strategies to limit overconsumption. Scientists from the Monell Center and collaborators have discovered that taste cells have several additional sugar detectors other than the previously known sweet receptor. "Detecting the sweetness of nutritive sugars is one of the most important tasks of our taste cells," said senior...

2010-11-19 13:09:59

Joint press release from NWO and TU Delft Researcher Jean-Paul Meijnen has 'trained' bacteria to convert all the main sugars in vegetable, fruit and garden waste efficiently into high-quality environmentally friendly products such as bioplastics. He will be defending his doctoral thesis on this topic, which was carried out in the context of the NWO B-Basic programme, at TU Delft on Monday 22 November 2010. There is considerable interest in bioplastics nowadays. The technical problems...

2010-09-15 16:48:32

Scientists have overturned the conventional wisdom that cooperation is essential for the well-being of the whole population, finding evidence that slackers can sometimes help the common good. Researchers, from Imperial College London, the Universities of Bath and Oxford, University College London and the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology studied populations of yeast and found that a mixture of 'co-operators' and 'cheats' grew faster than a more utopian one of only "co-operators."...

2010-08-03 16:46:00

In the news release, Study on Fructose and Pancreatic Cancer Generates Premature and Potentially Misleading Conclusions, issued 03-Aug-2010 by the Corn Refiners Association over PR Newswire, the source organization should be "Corn Refiners Association" rather than "Cancer Research Alliance", as incorrectly transmitted by PR Newswire. The complete, corrected release follows: Study on Fructose and Pancreatic Cancer Generates Premature and Potentially Misleading Conclusions WASHINGTON,...

2010-08-03 12:57:00

WASHINGTON, Aug. 3 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- A study published in the August issue of Cancer Research (1) has resulted in several premature and potentially misleading conclusions when it comes to fructose and its effect on pancreatic tumor cells. Unfortunately, the media covering this story, and even the authors, have been too quick to extrapolate the results of laboratory research on pure fructose to real-world conditions, which is not appropriate or helpful to consumers. The main...

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2010-05-13 13:25:00

Infants who receive sweet solutions before being immunized experience less pain and are more comfortable, reveals research published ahead of print in the Archives of Disease in Childhood. Healthcare professionals should consider giving infants aged 1-12 months a sweet solution of sucrose or glucose before immunizing a child, the international team of researchers recommended, because of the child's improved reaction to injections. Existing research shows the effectiveness of giving newborn...

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2010-02-10 14:10:00

Individual differences in liking for sweetness based in part on underlying biology New research from the Monell Center reports that children's response to intense sweet taste is related to both a family history of alcoholism and the child's own self-reports of depression. The findings illustrate how liking for sweets differs among children based on underlying familial and biological factors. "We know that sweet taste is rewarding to all kids and makes them feel good," said study lead author...


Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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