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Sunbird Reference Libraries

Page 1 of about 23 Articles
Lotens Sunbird
2008-08-15 21:58:28

The Loten's Sunbird (Cinnyris lotenius), also known as the Long-billed Sunbird, is one of a group of very small Old World passerine birds which feed largely on nectar. Sunbirds will also take insects, especially when feeding young and Loten's Sunbird is possibly more insectivorous than other sympatric species. Their flight is fast and direct on their short wings. Loten's Sunbird is a resident...

Seychelles Sunbird
2008-08-15 21:54:54

The Seychelles Sunbird (Nectarinia dussumieri), is a small passerine from the family of sunbirds. It is named after the French explorer Jean-Jacques Dussumier. It is native to the Seychelles where it's called kolibri in Creole. This bird is variously placed in the Cinnyris genus. It occurs on most of the larger granitic islands of the Seychelles Bank. It belongs to the endemic land bird species...

Souimanga Sunbird
2008-08-15 21:50:21

The Souimanga Sunbird (Cinnyris sovimanga), is a small passerine bird of the sunbird family, Nectariniidae. It is native to the islands of the western Indian Ocean where it occurs on Madagascar, the Aldabra Group and the Glorioso Islands. The Souimanga Sunbird can be found in a variety of habitats from mountain forests to mangroves and scrubland as well as in parks, gardens and other...

Olive-backed Sunbird
2008-08-15 21:46:50

The Olive-backed Sunbird (Cinnyris jugularis), also known as the Yellow-bellied Sunbird, is an Asian sunbird. The Olive-backed Sunbird is common across southern China to the Philippines and Malaysia down to northeast Australia. Originally from mangrove habitat, the Olive-backed sunbird has adapted well to humans, and is now common even in fairly densely populated areas, even forming their nests...

Purple Sunbird
2008-08-15 21:44:20

The Purple Sunbird (Cinnyris asiaticus), is a sunbird that is part of a group of very small Old World passerine birds. It is an abundant resident breeder across tropical southern Asia from the Persian Gulf to Southeast Asia. One to three eggs are laid in a suspended nest in a tree. This species is found in a variety of habitats with some trees, including forest and cultivation. Purple...

Variable Sunbird
2008-08-15 20:51:41

The Variable Sunbird (Cinnyris venustus ), is part of a group of very small Old World passerine birds. The Variable Sunbird is a fairly common resident breeder in equatorial Africa. This species was formerly known as (Nectarinia venusta). Variable Sunbirds are small, only 4 inches long. They have medium-length thin down-curved bills and brush-tipped tubular tongues, both adaptations to their...

Palestine Sunbird
2008-08-15 20:48:31

The Palestine Sunbird (Cinnyris oseus), also known as the Northern Orange-tufted Sunbird, is a small passerine bird of the sunbird family which is found in parts of the Middle East and sub-Saharan Africa. It is similar to the Orange-tufted Sunbird (Cinnyris bouvieri), found further south in Africa. It occurs in areas with high temperatures and dry climate from sea-level up to an altitude of...

Red-chested Sunbird
2008-08-15 20:45:51

The Red-chested Sunbird (Nectarinia erythrocerca), is a species of bird in the Nectariniidae family. It is found in Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, Sudan, Tanzania, and Uganda. Photo Copyright and Credit

Eastern Double-collared Sunbird
2008-08-14 11:05:17

The Eastern Double-collared Sunbird (Nectarinia mediocris), is a species of bird in the Nectariniidae family. It is found in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Tanzania, and Zambia. Photo Copyright and Credit

Regal Sunbird
2008-08-14 10:46:49

The Regal Sunbird (Nectarinia regia), is a species of bird in the Nectariniidae family. It is found in Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, Tanzania, and Uganda. Photo Copyright and Credit

Word of the Day
swell-mobsman
  • A member of the swell-mob; a genteelly clad pickpocket. Sometimes mobsman.
Use of the word 'swell-mobsman' dates at least to the early 1800s.