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Last updated on April 23, 2014 at 17:36 EDT

Latest Sunscreen controversy Stories

2006-02-02 12:45:00

By Amy Norton NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Women who've had common, highly curable forms of skin cancer may face a heightened risk of the deadlier skin tumor melanoma, researchers have found. Their study of more than 67,000 white postmenopausal women found that those with a history of non-melanoma skin cancer were 70 percent more likely than other women to develop melanoma during the study period. That was after factors such as age, family history of cancer and past sun exposure were taken...

2005-08-29 15:16:37

Immune protection factor (IPF) in sunscreens and its relation to sun protection factor (SPF) is essential in determining skin cancer prevention ability, researchers found. In this paper, published in the September issue of the Journal of Investigative Dermatology , researchers discuss the problems associated with the evaluation of IPF of sunscreens, different techniques for the assessment of IPF in human skin, and propose development of standard techniques for IPF assessment. Based on past...

2005-08-26 14:10:00

NEW YORK -- Despite spending hours under the sun, most college athletes are lax about protecting their skin with sunscreen, a new survey suggests. Of the 186 athletes researchers surveyed during the summer practice season, 85 percent said they had not used sunscreen at all in the past week. Only a handful -- 6 percent -- said they'd used it on at least three days during the previous week. The students often cited inconvenience or forgetfulness as the reasons they went without sun block. But a...

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2005-08-17 07:21:56

Sunbathing is a dangerous compulsion for some, study suggests HealthDay News -- Some sun worshippers may actually be psychologically addicted to tanning, researchers report. The finding may explain why, despite widespread campaigns to alert people to the dangers of ultraviolet (UV) radiation, many people continue to sunbathe or use tanning booths. In two related studies, researchers also found that state laws can keep children from patronizing tanning booths, and that labeling a sunscreen...

2005-08-15 15:03:47

CHICAGO (Reuters) - Using a strong sunscreen does not lead people to spend more time sunbathing in the belief they can do so safely, researchers said on Monday. Study author Alain Dupuy of the Saint Louis Hospital in Paris wanted to know if the higher protection afforded by stronger sunscreens would encourage longer sun exposure by delaying the warning sign of sunburn and giving a false sense of safety. As part of the study, sunscreen was provided for free to 367 vacationers at...

2005-08-15 15:00:00

CHICAGO -- Using a strong sunscreen does not lead people to spend more time sunbathing in the belief they can do so safely, researchers said on Monday. Study author Alain Dupuy of the Saint Louis Hospital in Paris wanted to know if the higher protection afforded by stronger sunscreens would encourage longer sun exposure by delaying the warning sign of sunburn and giving a false sense of safety. As part of the study, sunscreen was provided for free to 367 vacationers at French seaside...