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Latest Superconductivity Stories

2010-08-06 17:42:33

Physicists are divided on whether string theory is a viable theory of everything, but many agree that it offers a new way to look at physical phenomena that have otherwise proven difficult to describe. In the past decade, physicists have used string theory to build a connection between quantum and gravitational mechanics, known as gauge/gravity duality. MIT physicists, led by Hong Liu and John McGreevy, have now used that connection to describe a specific physical phenomenon "” the...

2010-07-29 09:11:45

Study of quantum phase changes reveals surprising relationship between magnetism and electricity U.S., German and Austrian physicists studying the perplexing class of materials that includes high-temperature superconductors are reporting this week the unexpected discovery of a simple "scaling" behavior in the electronic excitations measured in a related material. The experiments, which were conducted on magnetic heavy-fermion metals, offer direct evidence of the large-scale electronic...

2010-07-15 16:10:43

In a major step toward understanding the mysterious "pseudogap" state in high-temperature cuprate superconductors, a team of Cornell, Binghamton University and Brookhaven National Laboratory scientists have found a "broken symmetry," where electrons act like molecules in a liquid crystal: Electrons between copper and oxygen atoms arrange themselves differently "north-south" than "east-west." This simple discovery opens a door to new research that could lead to room-temperature...

2010-07-15 13:22:35

Binghamton University physicist Michael Lawler and his colleagues have made a breakthrough that could lead to advances in superconductors. Their findings will be published this week in the prestigious British journal Nature. The data Lawler analyzed have been available for several years, but have not been well understood until now. "The pattern looked so mysterious and interesting," he said. "It's so different from any other material we've ever looked at. Trying to understand what this data...

2010-07-15 02:52:25

May lead to ways to overcome barrier to room-temperature superconductivity in copper-oxides Scientists have been trying for some 20 years to understand why the low temperature at which copper-oxide superconductors carry current with no resistance can't be increased to be closer to room temperature. Recently, scientists have focused on trying to understand and control an electronic phase called the "pseudogap" phase, which is non-superconducting and is observed at a temperature above the...

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2010-07-08 13:36:41

Scientists at JILA, working with Italian theorists, have discovered another notable similarity between ultracold atomic gases and high-temperature superconductors, suggesting there may be a relatively simple shared explanation for equivalent behaviors of the two very different systems. Described in Nature Physics,* the new research lends more support to the idea that JILA studies of superfluidity (flow with zero friction) in atomic gases may help scientists understand far more complicated...

2010-06-29 02:33:47

When high-temperature superconductors were first announced in the late 1980s, it was thought that they would lead to ultra-efficient magnetic trains and other paradigm-shifting technologies. That didn't happen. Now, a University of Florida scientist is among a team of physicists to help explain why. In a paper set to appear Sunday in the online edition of Nature Physics, Peter Hirschfeld, a UF professor of physics, and five other researchers for the first time describe precisely how the...

2010-06-23 01:10:40

What could be better than diamond when it comes to a superhard material for electronics under extreme thermal and pressure conditions? Quite possibly BC5, a diamond-like material with an extremely high boron content that offers exceptional hardness and resistance to fracture, but unlike diamond, it is a superconductor rather than an insulator. A research team in China studying BC5 describes its potential in the Journal of Applied Physics, which is published by the American Institute of...

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2010-06-14 08:45:52

Material's fluctuating response to a magnetic field could lead to switchable superconducting wires A team of scientists from Bar-Ilan University, Israel, and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory has fabricated thin films patterned with large arrays of nanowires and loops that are superconducting "” able to carry electric current with no resistance "” when cooled below about 30 kelvin (-243 degrees Celsius). Even more interesting, the scientists...

2010-05-28 13:57:06

New materials yield clues about high-temperature superconductors A team of U.S. and Chinese physicists are zeroing in on critical effects at the heart of the latest high-temperature superconductors -- but they're using other materials to do it. In new research appearing online today in the journal Physical Review Letters, the Rice University-led team offers new evidence about the quantum features of the latest class of high-temperature superconductors, a family of iron-based compounds called...


Latest Superconductivity Reference Libraries

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2010-09-23 20:39:09

An electromagnet, a magnet whose magnetic field is produced by the flow of electric current, works until the electric current ceases. The magnetic field in a simple electromagnet is created by a wire passing through it with an electric current. The strength of the magnet depends on the amount of current. By making the wire into a coil the magnetic field is concentrated. A straight tube coil is a solenoid. A stronger magnetic field can be produced by putting a ferromagnetic material, such as...

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Word of the Day
ramage
  • Boughs or branches.
  • Warbling of birds in trees.
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