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Latest Supercontinents Stories

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2011-08-09 09:59:38

The Earth was a much different place 1.1 billion years ago. Researchers are discovering strong evidence that parts of what are now Texas and Antarctica were connected, according to Staci Loewy, a geochemist at California State University, Bakersfield. "I can go to the Franklin Mountains in West Texas and stand next to what was once part of Coats Land in Antarctica," says Loewy, "That's so amazing." Long before the supercontinent Pangaea formed, there were other landforms bouncing around on...

2011-08-04 11:25:00

CALGARY, Aug. 4, 2011 /PRNewswire/ - (TSX-V: ROZ) - Rodinia Oil Corp. ("Rodinia") is pleased to announce that it is preparing to run the second intermediate casing string prior to drilling ahead into prospective formations at "Mulyawara 1", in the Officer Basin of South Australia. Rodinia began drilling Mulyawara 1 on the morning of Thursday June 9, 2011 (Australian Central Standard Time) and reached the first intermediate casing point of 1,525 meters on August 1, 2011. The casing shoe is...

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2011-05-15 09:43:23

More than 200 million years ago, mammals and reptiles lived in their own separate worlds on the supercontinent Pangaea, despite little geographical incentive to do so. Mammals lived in areas of twice-yearly seasonal rainfall; reptiles stayed in areas where rains came just once a year. Mammals lose more water when they excrete, and thus need water-rich environments to survive. Results are published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.Aggregating nearly the entire landmass of...

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2010-08-10 20:20:00

The Gondwana supercontinent underwent a 60-degree rotation across Earth's surface during the Early Cambrian period, according to new evidence uncovered by a team of Yale University geologists. Gondwana made up the southern half of Pangaea, the giant supercontinent that constituted the Earth's landmass before it broke up into the separate continents we see today. The study, which appears in the August issue of the journal Geology, has implications for the environmental conditions that existed...

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2010-03-31 08:36:48

"Blindsnakes are not very pretty, are rarely noticed, and are often mistaken for earthworms," admits Blair Hedges, professor of biology at Penn State University. "Nonetheless, they tell a very interesting evolutionary story." Hedges and Nicolas Vidal, of the Mus©um National d'Histoire Naturelle in Paris, are co-leaders of the team that discovered that blindsnakes are one of the few groups of organisms that inhabited Madagascar when it broke from India about 100 million years ago and are...

2009-11-11 17:13:27

Geochemical analysis of rare ancient soil produces new paleoclimate data The Congo Basin "” with its massive, lush tropical rain forest "” was far different 150 million to 200 million years ago. At that time Africa and South America were part of the single continent Gondwana. The Congo Basin was arid, with a small amount of seasonal rainfall, and few bushes or trees populated the landscape, according to a new geochemical analysis of rare ancient soils. The geochemical analysis...

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2009-10-03 11:19:54

Princeton University scientists have shown that, in ancient times, the Earth's magnetic field was structured like the two-pole model of today, suggesting that the methods geoscientists use to reconstruct the geography of early land masses on the globe are accurate. The findings may lead to a better understanding of historical continental movement, which relates to changes in climate. By taking a closer look at the 1.1 billion-year-old volcanic rocks on the north shore of Lake Superior, the...

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2008-12-16 09:30:25

Two giant plumes of hot rock deep within the earth are linked to the plate motions that shape the continents, researchers have found. The two superplumes, one beneath Hawaii and the other beneath Africa, have likely existed for at least 200 million years, explained Wendy Panero, assistant professor of earth sciences at Ohio State University. The giant plumes -- or "superpiles" as Panero calls them -- rise from the bottom of Earth's mantle, just above our planet's core. Each is larger than the...

2008-09-19 03:00:23

By Zhu, Wenbin Zhang, Zhiyong; Shu, Liangshu; Lu, Huafu; Su, Jinbao; Yang, Wei Mafic dykes are observed in the Korla region along the northern Tarim Block, NW China. Our sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe U-Pb zircon ages, the first determined for these dykes, indicate that the mafic dykes were mainly formed at 650-630 Ma, and thus document the youngest known igneous activity associated with rifting in the Tarim Block during the Neoproterozoic. Combined with previous geochronological...


Latest Supercontinents Reference Libraries

North America
2013-02-18 15:40:12

North America is a continent completely within the Northern Hemisphere and almost completely within the Western Hemisphere. It’s also considered a northern subcontinent of the Americas. It’s bordered to the north by the Arctic Ocean, to the west and south by the Pacific Ocean, to the southeast by South America and the Caribbean Sea, and to the east by the Atlantic Ocean. This continent covers an area of approximately 9,540,000 sq miles, about 4.8 percent of the plants surface or about...

Geologic Clock With Events And Periods
2012-11-18 19:08:04

The Paleoproterozoic is the first of three subdivisions of the Proterozoic Eon (occurring from 2.5 billion to 1.6 billion years ago (Ga). This period is marked by the first stabilization of the continents, and also when cyanobacteria--a type of bacteria that uses biochemical processes of photosynthesis to produce oxygen--evolved. Experts have found paleontological evidence that during at least part of the Paleoproterozoic era, about 1.8 Ga, the earth year was about 450 days long, with days...

Geologic Clock With Events And Periods
2012-10-22 14:17:38

The Archean (formerly Archaeozoic) is a geologic eon between the Hadean and Proterozoic eons. The Archean Eon begins at roughly 3.8 billion years ago (Ga) and ends at about 2.5 Ga. But unlike all other geological ages, which are based on stratigraphy, The Archean eon is defined chronometrically. The lower boundary of 3.8 Ga has also not been officially recognized by the International Commission on Stratigraphy. The name Archean is derived from the ancient Greek (Arkhe), meaning...

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Word of the Day
siliqua
  • A Roman unit of weight, 1⁄1728 of a pound.
  • A weight of four grains used in weighing gold and precious stones; a carat.
  • In anatomy, a formation suggesting a husk or pod.
  • The lowest unit in the Roman coinage, the twenty-fourth part of a solidus.
  • A coin of base silver of the Gothic and Lombard kings of Italy.
'Siliqua' comes from a Latin word meaning 'a pod.'
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