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Latest Superhydrophobe Stories

Water Bounces Like A Ball Off Super Waterproof Surfaces
2014-05-21 03:52:47

Brigham Young University Research on super-hydrophobic surfaces could result in cleaner, more efficient power In a basement lab on BYU’s campus, mechanical engineering professor Julie Crockett analyzes water as it bounces like a ball and rolls down a ramp. This phenomenon occurs because Crockett and her colleague Dan Maynes have created a sloped channel that is super-hydrophobic, or a surface that is extremely difficult to wet. In layman’s terms, it’s the most extreme form of...

2014-04-23 23:00:57

Superhydrophobic Coating vs. Firefighting Water Cannon (PRWEB) April 23, 2014 Ultra-Ever Dry, a superhydrophobic coating that repels water and most other liquids will face its greatest challenge to date on National Geographic's new television program, Showdown of the Unbeatables. Each week (Friday at 9:00 PM EST), the very best American companies do battle with their prize products. And on May 2nd, UltraTech International's Ultra-Ever Dry will go head-to-head with the ultimate...

2014-03-26 23:31:15

NEI Corporation announced today that it has introduced NANOMYTE® SuperCN Plus - a functionally graded coating that imparts superhydrophobic properties to the underlying substrate while providing greater abrasion resistance compared to existing superhydrophobic coatings. Surfaces treated with SuperCN Plus force liquids to bead up and roll off, shedding water instantly and leaving the surface completely dry. Somerset, NJ (PRWEB) March 26, 2014 NEI Corporation announced today that it...

2014-01-20 09:44:16

Modeling structures that trap air under water and could one day lead to more energy-efficient ships described in the journal 'Physics of Fluids' From the sleek hulls of racing yachts to Michael Phelps' shaved legs, most objects that move through the water quickly are also smooth. But researchers from UCLA have found that bumpiness can sometimes be better. "A properly designed rough surface, contrary to our intuition, can reduce skin-friction drag," said John Kim, a professor in the...

Nano-Cone Textures Produce Extremely Robust Water-Repellent Surfaces
2013-10-22 10:29:01

Brookhaven National Laboratory Surfaces with differently shaped nanoscale textures may yield improved materials for applications in transportation, energy, and diagnostics When it comes to designing extremely water-repellent surfaces, shape and size matter. That's the finding of a group of scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory, who investigated the effects of differently shaped, nanoscale textures on a material's ability to force water droplets to...

2013-10-07 23:22:27

Reportbuyer.com just published a new market research report: Bioinspired and Nanoengineered Surfaces: Technologies, Applications and Global Markets. London (PRWEB) October 07, 2013 MOTIVATION Over the past decade, bioinspired structures—ranging from various plant leaves, to insects, gecko feet, crustaceans, and even butterfly wings—have been the subject of intense scientific scrutiny. In many cases scientists have unraveled and replicated the underlying physics and chemistry of these...

Making Water Droplets Dance
2013-07-23 04:59:10

[ Watch the Video: Magnetic Droplets on a Superhydrophobic Surface ] Enid Burns for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Scientists are experimenting with non-dissapative droplet patterns to study reversible switching between static and dynamic self-assembly. Researchers from Aalto University and Paris Tech studied water droplets containing nanoparticles on a strong water repellent surface to observe the self-assembly process. A video demonstrating the mesmerizing phenomena was posted...

2013-07-18 23:17:53

According to a new technical market research report, the global market for nanoengineered surfaces was valued at $183 million in 2012. BCC Research expects the market to reach $799.3 million by 2018 and nearly $2.5 billion by 2022. Wellesley, MA (PRWEB) July 18, 2013 According to a new technical market research report, Bioinspired And Nanoengineered Surfaces: Technologies, Applications And Global Markets (Report code: AVM089A) from BCC Research (http://www.bccresearch.com), the global...

Why Do Some Surfaces Repel Water, While Others Attract It?
2013-07-17 05:17:38

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Researchers at MIT are working on better understanding how surfaces attract or repel water. When water strikes a surface, sometimes it spreads evenly while other times it beads into tiny droplets. Studying this behavior can lead to improvements in many applications. If water strikes a material and maximizes its contact with it, then it is known as hydrophilic, but when water is naturally repelled on a material, it is called...


Word of the Day
glogg
  • Scandinavian punch made of claret and aquavit with spices and raisins and orange peel and sugar.
This word comes from the Swedish 'glogg,' which is an alteration of 'glodgat,' mulled (wine).
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