Quantcast

Latest Superhydrophobe Stories

Why Do Some Surfaces Repel Water, While Others Attract It?
2013-07-17 05:17:38

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Researchers at MIT are working on better understanding how surfaces attract or repel water. When water strikes a surface, sometimes it spreads evenly while other times it beads into tiny droplets. Studying this behavior can lead to improvements in many applications. If water strikes a material and maximizes its contact with it, then it is known as hydrophilic, but when water is naturally repelled on a material, it is called...

2013-07-01 23:20:57

Retailer offers first Rust-Oleum® formula to repel any water-based liquid under extreme conditions, both indoors and out. (PRWEB) July 01, 2013 TheHardwareCity recently announced its rollout of an innovative new product by manufacturer Rust-Oleum called NeverWet, which promises to be the most effective and advanced water-proofer on today’s market. "This is a game changer," said Jim Stinner, vice president of marketing for Rust-Oleum. "Everyone is going to want to...

New Type Of Paper Created That Repels Wide Variety Of Liquids
2013-05-29 10:37:21

Georgia Institute of Technology Paper is known for its ability to absorb liquids, making it ideal for products such as paper towels. But by modifying the underlying network of cellulose fibers, etching off surface "fluff" and applying a thin chemical coating, researchers have created a new type of paper that repels a wide variety of liquids — including water and oil. The paper takes advantage of the so-called "lotus effect" — used by leaves of the lotus plant — to...

Dew Drops Help Keep Cicada Wings Fresh And Clean
2013-04-30 09:42:33

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A spritz of dew drops is all the cicadas on the East Coast need to keep their wings fresh and clean as they emerge from their 17-year slumber. A research team from the universities of Duke and James Cook revealed dew drops are beneficial not only in cleaning cicada wings, but other water-repellant, or superhydrophobic, surfaces as well. Dew drops “jump” by themselves on such surfaces, carrying away contaminants....

New Class Of Hydrophobic Ceramics From Rare Earth Elements
2013-01-22 05:13:50

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Surfaces that can shed water and survive harsh environments could have broad applications in a wide range of industries including energy, water, transportation, construction and medicine. The condensation of water is an integral part of many industrial processes, for example, and most electric power plants and desalination plants have condensers. Materials that prevent water from spreading over a surface — hydrophobic materials...

2012-11-27 15:35:35

The wetting model is a classical problem in surface science and biomimetic science. Professor LIU Jianlin and his collaborators from China University of Petroleum, Wuhan University and Fourth Military Medical University approached this old and classical problem from a new direction. They stressed that it is the triple contact line and not the contact area of the droplet/solid interface that determines the macroscopic contact angle. The proposed continuum model, termed the mechanism-based...

Interview With Professor Shu Yang Of The University of Pennsylvania
2012-10-18 08:26:27

Jedidiah Becker for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Color is all around us - from painted buildings, to stop signs, to butterfly wings. Traditionally, colorful compounds, called pigments, are added to material to give them the desired color. However, color can often fade and is susceptible to damage from environmental conditions, like rain. A more novel way to create color is to synthesize polymers to create surface types and colors for specific applications. However, creating...

Iridescent And Ultra Water Proof Material Created At Penn State
2012-10-16 04:29:43

Jedidiah Becker for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Read my exclusive interview with Professor Shu Yang about her research. Have you ever looked at a peacock´s feathers, a butterfly´s wing or an oily puddle on the road and wondered why they have those shimmering, vibrant colors? Unlike the colors you see in spring grass, an animals´ fur or fading autumn leaves, these iridescent hues are not the result of pigmentation but rather of a naturally occurring...


Word of the Day
out-herod
  • In the phrase to out-herod Herod, to be more violent than Herod (as represented in the old mystery plays); hence, to exceed in any excess of evil.
Herod refers to 'Herod the Great,' a Roman client king and 'a madman who murdered his own family and a great many rabbis.' According to the OED, the term is 'chiefly with allusion to Shakespeare's use' in Hamlet.
Related