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Latest Supernova remnants Stories

Earth Safe And Sound From Supernova In 2012: NASA
2011-12-19 12:30:19

[ Watch the Video ] NASA reported recently that astronomers can say with certainty there is no fear of a supernova being close enough to hurt Earth, especially by 2012. Astronomers believe that about one or two supernovae explode each century in our galaxy.  However, for Earth's ozone layer to experience damage from a supernova, the blast must occur less than 50 light-years away. All of the nearby stars capable of going supernova are much farther than 50 light-years. A...

WISE Images Supernova's Rose
2011-12-12 07:10:26

About 3,700 years ago, people on Earth would have seen a brand-new bright star in the sky. It slowly dimmed out of sight and was eventually forgotten, until modern astronomers later found its remains, called Puppis A. In this new image from NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), Puppis A looks less like the remains of a supernova explosion and more like a red rose. Puppis A (pronounced PUP-pis) was formed when a massive star ended its life in a supernova, the most brilliant and...

Image 1 - Supernova Reaching Its Peak Brightness Thursday And Friday
2011-09-08 13:19:14

Astronomers will be losing sleep as they wait on a newly discovered supernova to reach its peak in brightness on Thursday and Friday. The exploding star is about 21 million light years away and was first spotted by telescopes August 23. It is the closest of its kind to be seen in four decades and is located in the "Pinwheel Galaxy" above the Big Dipper. Amateur star-gazers could even equip themselves with 20x80 binoculars to help see the exploding star. Astronomers say that the...

2011-09-06 20:35:00

TelescopeKing.com - According to sciencenews.org, on August 24, 2011, astronomers discovered a supernova in progress located in the M101 galaxy. This discovery was unique because the supernova was in its early stages and had been estimated to have begun a mere 12 hours earlier. Secondly, the supernova is very close to earth, relatively speaking. It was predicted that the peak of the explosion would occur in early September, and that prediction seems to be very accurate as the...

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2011-07-02 06:56:32

"Zombie" stars that explode like bombs as they die, only to revive by sucking matter out of other stars. According to an astrophysicist at UC Santa Barbara, this isn't the plot for the latest 3D blockbuster movie. Instead, it's something that happens every day in the universe "“"“ something that can be used to measure dark energy. This special category of stars, known as Type Ia supernovae, help to probe the mystery of dark energy, which scientists believe is related to the...

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2011-04-18 07:50:00

Legend has it that a noon-day star appeared in 1630 at the birth of King Charles II, who later was restored to the English monarchy after his father was executed, reports AFP. Edward Matthew, an English writer, described the event as "The Most Glorious Star"¦ shining most brightly in a Miraculous manner in the Face of the Sun," in 1661. He writes in a pamphlet, "Never any Starre [had] appeared before at the birth of any (the Highest humane Hero) except our Savior." Historians have...

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2011-03-15 08:50:00

The wispy arms of the Tarantula Nebula were originally thought to resemble spindly spider legs, giving the nebula its unusual name. The part of the nebula visible in this image from Hubble's Advanced Camera for Surveys is criss-crossed with tendrils of dust and gas churned up by recent supernovae. These supernova remnants include NGC 2060, visible above and to the left of the center of this image, which contains the brightest known pulsar. The tarantula's bite goes beyond NGC 2060. Near the...

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2010-09-02 14:42:56

An international team of astronomers using the Hubble Space Telescope reports a significant brightening of the emissions from Supernova 1987A. The results, which appear in this week's Science magazine, are consistent with theoretical predictions about how supernovae interact with their immediate galactic environment. The team observed the supernova remnant in optical, ultraviolet, and near-infrared light. They studied the interaction between the ejecta from the stellar explosion and a glowing...

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2010-08-04 10:30:00

Astronomers using ESO's Very Large Telescope have for the first time obtained a three-dimensional view of the distribution of the innermost material expelled by a recently exploded star. The original blast was not only powerful, according to the new results. It was also more concentrated in one particular direction. This is a strong indication that the supernova must have been very turbulent, supporting the most recent computer models. Unlike the Sun, which will die rather quietly, massive...

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2010-05-25 06:35:00

This beautiful composite image shows N49, the aftermath of a supernova explosion in the Large Magellanic Cloud. A new long observation from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, shown in blue, reveals evidence for a bullet-shaped object being blown out of debris field left over from an exploded star. In order to detect this bullet, a team of researchers led by Sangwook Park of Penn State University used Chandra to observe N49 for over 30 hours. This bullet can be seen in the bottom right hand...


Latest Supernova remnants Reference Libraries

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2004-10-19 04:45:44

Tycho Brahe -- Tycho Brahe (December 14, 1546 - October 24, 1601) was a Danish astronomer. He had Uraniborg built; which become an early "research institute". For purposes of publication, Tycho owned a printing press and paper mill. His best known assistant was Kepler. Tycho realized that progress in the science of astronomy could be achieved, not by occasional haphazard observations, but only by systematic and rigorous observation, night after night, and by using instruments of the...

6_19859ff34fd03d00777232e2520ce83f5
2004-10-19 04:45:42

Supernova Remnant -- A supernova remnant (SNR) is made up of the materials left behind by the gigantic explosion of a star in a supernova. There are two possible routes to this end: either a massive star may cease to generate fusion energy in its core, and collapse inward under the force of its own gravity, or a white dwarf star may accumulate material from a companion star until it reaches a critical mass and undergoes a similar collapse. In either case, the resulting supernova...

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2004-10-19 04:45:40

Supernova 1987a -- Supernova 1987a was a supernova in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a nearby dwarf galaxy. It occurred approximately 50 kiloparsecs from Earth, the closest supernova since Supernova 1604, which occurred in the Milky Way itself. The light from the supernova reached Earth on February 23, 1987. Its brightness peaked in May with a magnitude of about 3 and slowly declined in the following months. It was modern astronomers' first opportunity to see a supernova up close....

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2004-10-19 04:45:40

Crab Nebula -- The Crab Nebula (Messier 1, NGC 1952) is the object the which started Charles Messier logging non-cometary objects on his Messier Catalog. It is the expanding cloud of gas thrown off in the explosion that gave rise to the 1054 supernova recorded by Chinese astronomers, now more than 6 light years across (the nebula is currently expanding at 1000 km/sec and the total mass of ejected material is about 0.1 solar masses). The supernova which produced it was bright enough to...

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Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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