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Latest Surface runoff Stories

2008-08-07 03:00:18

"Well, it starts with rain," says Mara Moran, 12, a Girl Scout with Troop 1706 in Cheverly, Md. "My teacher says that the water we drink is the same water the cavemen drank.""Yeah, people think you can make water, but you can't," says Deirdre Harder, 9, as she helps Mara push a big plastic barrel. "It doesn't regenerate," adds Emily Castelli, 13, who is tugging at the same barrel. "It's the same water over and over we get from rain filling the rivers and lakes and things." "We have to learn...

2008-08-06 09:00:31

By Brandon Shulleeta, The Daily Progress, Charlottesville, Va. Aug. 6--A new report recommends ways for Albemarle County to reduce stormwater runoff caused by development. The report was prepared by the Southern Environmental Law Center, the Rivanna Conservation Society and the University of Virginia School of Law's Environmental Law and Conservation Clinic. The Board of Supervisors will hear the recommendations at its meeting today. Those recommendations aim primarily at limiting...

2008-08-04 15:00:28

By Emily Christensen, Waterloo-Cedar Falls Courier, Iowa Aug. 4--CEDAR FALLS -- A vegetative island in the middle of the Hartman Reserve Nature Center parking lot is getting a makeover that will improve the look of the land and protect the forest surrounding it. County Conservation Board staff began building a rain garden in the area this spring, but their work was cut short by the wild weather events in May and June. Work has resumed, and Ed Gruenwald, director of the nature center,...

2008-07-30 06:00:34

By Wade Rawlins, The News & Observer, Raleigh, N.C. Jul. 30--Last year's drought had at least one benefit: It made the state's beaches some of the cleanest in the nation. Without stormwater runoff pouring into rivers that feed into the ocean, visitors to North Carolina beaches last year swam in much less bacterial pollution, according to the annual survey of water quality at public beaches released Tuesday. Nancy Stoner, director of the clean water project for the Natural...

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2008-07-28 11:25:00

Farmers are discovering the consequences of massive flooding throughout the Midwest. The excess rainfall has caused the nutrient-rich topsoil to be washed away. Jim Lankford, a corn farmer, said his crops used to stretch to the White River, now the river has eroded a new route for itself through his crops. The flood spread rocks in other spots, making it look as if Lankford planted soybeans in a gravel road. Elsewhere, silt is piled up like sand dunes and uprooted trees still litter...

2008-07-25 12:00:48

By Joe Segura, Press-Telegram, Long Beach, Calif. Jul. 25--LOS ANGELES -- Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Board officials on Wednesday vowed to push for legal remedies to get the agency back on track to protect public health and the environment from what they called the "devastating effects of polluted storm- water runoff." Board chairwoman Fran Diamond emphasized that the water agency has complied with an Orange County judge's order, suspending all urban runoff quality standards, but...

2008-07-23 03:00:35

By Samantha Gonzaga The state's Water Resources Control Board has halted all new water-related construction in the Los Angeles Basin after an Orange County judge ordered the suspension of urban runoff quality standards. It's the latest development in a years-long dispute involving the 2005 Basin Plan, a set of stormwater standards and guidelines for the disposal of waste water. About 21 cities and the nonprofit legal group Building Industry Legal Defense Foundation filed a lawsuit...

2008-07-21 15:00:51

By Susan Palmer, The Register-Guard, Eugene, Ore. Jul. 19--If you want to find dangerous pollutants in the McKenzie River, you have to look very hard. Such small amounts of certain pollutants -- pesticides, creosote and other toxic chemicals -- are present in the river that water quality monitors needed a special technique to detect them. As part of a long-term protection and monitoring effort, the Eugene Water & Electric Board wanted to get a more refined look at water...

2008-07-21 03:00:25

By Tampone, Kevin SYRACUSE - Dust. Who would have thought it could be useful? Really, it's an irritant to everyone from allergy sufferers to neat freaks. But a team of Clarkson University professors is aiming to use something akin to dust in measuring airflow and temperature within indoor environments. The project is funded with a $100,000 grant from the Syracuse Center of Excellence (CoE) in Environmental and Energy Systems. The dust we're talking about here is, of course, a hit...

2008-07-19 21:00:18

By Kristin S. Agostoni Regional water-quality regulators said Friday a recent court ruling has forced them to quit issuing citations for illegal stormwater discharges and pursuing pending violations - including a stack mailed this spring to several South Bay cities. Officials with the Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board, which covers Los Angeles and Ventura counties, said they also would halt certain permits for new construction projects as a result of the court decision....


Latest Surface runoff Reference Libraries

Erosion
2013-04-01 12:48:39

Erosion is the process by which rock and soil are taken from the surface of the Earth by exogenetic processes like wind or the flow of water, and then transported and deposited in another location. While erosion is a natural process, human activities have increased by 10 to 40 times the rate at which erosion is happening globally. Excessive erosion results in problems such as desertification, decreases in agricultural productivity because of land degradation, sedimentation of waterways,...

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2009-07-06 17:58:20

The water cycle (or hydrologic cycle) describes the continuous movement of water above, below, and on the planet. Since the water cycle is in fact a "cycle", there is no beginning or end. Water exists in three states: liquid, vapor, and ice. Although the balance of water on our planet is fairly constant, individual water molecules may come and go. The water cycle is driven by the sun. The sun heats the oceans and allows water to evaporate into the air. The sun also heats snow and ice which...

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Word of the Day
call-note
  • The call or cry of a bird or other animal to its mate or its young.
'Call-note' is newer than 'bird-call,' which originally referred to 'an instrument for imitating the note of birds' but now also refers to 'the song or cry of a bird.'
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