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Latest Surface runoff Stories

2008-07-21 15:00:51

By Susan Palmer, The Register-Guard, Eugene, Ore. Jul. 19--If you want to find dangerous pollutants in the McKenzie River, you have to look very hard. Such small amounts of certain pollutants -- pesticides, creosote and other toxic chemicals -- are present in the river that water quality monitors needed a special technique to detect them. As part of a long-term protection and monitoring effort, the Eugene Water & Electric Board wanted to get a more refined look at water...

2008-07-21 03:00:25

By Tampone, Kevin SYRACUSE - Dust. Who would have thought it could be useful? Really, it's an irritant to everyone from allergy sufferers to neat freaks. But a team of Clarkson University professors is aiming to use something akin to dust in measuring airflow and temperature within indoor environments. The project is funded with a $100,000 grant from the Syracuse Center of Excellence (CoE) in Environmental and Energy Systems. The dust we're talking about here is, of course, a hit...

2008-07-19 21:00:18

By Kristin S. Agostoni Regional water-quality regulators said Friday a recent court ruling has forced them to quit issuing citations for illegal stormwater discharges and pursuing pending violations - including a stack mailed this spring to several South Bay cities. Officials with the Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board, which covers Los Angeles and Ventura counties, said they also would halt certain permits for new construction projects as a result of the court decision....

2008-07-16 09:00:45

By Liz Mitchell, The Island Packet, Hilton Head Island, S.C. Jul. 16--In an effort to save the May River from pollutants and bacteria, Bluffton officials plan to redirect stormwater from the May northward to the Colleton River. Efforts will include removing mounds of dirt obstructing the flow of runoff, installing a pumping system and creating a wetland. Ten years ago, runoff flowed to both rivers, but rapid growth in and around downtown Bluffton pushed a continuous flow into the May,...

2008-07-13 06:00:15

By Jay Price, The News & Observer, Raleigh, N.C. Jul. 13--The pause in construction has allowed governments and environmentalists to get ahead of some of the coastal boom. The legislature is working on tougher controls on coastal development aimed at reducing stormwater runoff, which is a major cause of contaminated shellfish beds. A primary feature is requiring ponds that retain runoff. Environmental groups back the more restrictive rules. They also hope to take advantage of...

2008-07-09 15:00:19

By Erik Robinson, The Columbian, Vancouver, Wash. Jul. 9--Critics of a new Columbia River crossing have long argued that a planned replacement bridge on Interstate 5 will degrade the environment and fuel more urban sprawl. Now, federal environmental regulators are echoing many of those same concerns -- plus a new one. The Environmental Protection Agency called for project officials to assure that bridge footings drilled deep into the river bottom won't pollute Clark County's major...

2008-07-08 06:00:00

By Kevin Clerici, Ventura County Star, Calif. Jul. 8--State water regulators Monday abruptly canceled a public workshop planned for this week in Ventura, temporarily silencing dozens of local officials who had prepared for weeks to argue against tough new storm-water rules for Ventura County. Thursday's workshop before the Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board was canceled because of a legal ruling last week involving the board, according to a brief notice sent Monday to local...

2008-07-05 09:00:14

By Kim Brown, Tulsa World, Okla. Jul. 5--Water conservation isn't a new topic for gardeners, but designing gardens to use rain and runoff water to help the environment are on the forefront of national garden trends. That's one reason why the Tulsa Herb Society is hosting the free lecture, "An Evening with Holly Hoffmann," from 7-8:30 p.m. Monday at the Tulsa Garden Center, 2435 S. Peoria Ave. From practicality to preservation, Hoffmann said she creates rain gardens -- or depressed...

2008-07-04 03:00:14

By O'Riordan, Timothy Agriculture is beginning to be counted in the sustainability stakes. Agricultural runoff poses one of the most significant threats to physical and chemical water quality in the United Kingdom, according to the U.K. Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs. And, as Juha Siikamaki makes clear in his article, "Climate Change and U.S. Agriculture: Examining the Connections" (page 36), the agricultural sector contributes a significant amount of greenhouse gas...

2008-07-02 12:00:00

By Alex Breitler, The Record, Stockton, Calif. Jul. 2--STOCKTON -- Two Delta groups with normally opposite interests said Tuesday they intend to sue the city of Stockton and San Joaquin County for pollution coming from stormwater runoff and sewage. The Coalition for a Sustainable Delta, a group of south Valley farmers and water users, claims Stockton has allowed heavy metals, chemicals and pesticides to escape through storm drains and into the fragile estuary. The California...


Latest Surface runoff Reference Libraries

Erosion
2013-04-01 12:48:39

Erosion is the process by which rock and soil are taken from the surface of the Earth by exogenetic processes like wind or the flow of water, and then transported and deposited in another location. While erosion is a natural process, human activities have increased by 10 to 40 times the rate at which erosion is happening globally. Excessive erosion results in problems such as desertification, decreases in agricultural productivity because of land degradation, sedimentation of waterways,...

22_319d33a1f9f347feb9c006816dbc1357
2009-07-06 17:58:20

The water cycle (or hydrologic cycle) describes the continuous movement of water above, below, and on the planet. Since the water cycle is in fact a "cycle", there is no beginning or end. Water exists in three states: liquid, vapor, and ice. Although the balance of water on our planet is fairly constant, individual water molecules may come and go. The water cycle is driven by the sun. The sun heats the oceans and allows water to evaporate into the air. The sun also heats snow and ice which...

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Word of the Day
ween
  • To think; to imagine; to fancy.
  • To be of opinion; have the notion; think; imagine; suppose.
The word 'ween' comes from Middle English wene, from Old English wēn, wēna ("hope, weening, expectation"), from Proto-Germanic *wēniz, *wēnōn (“hope, expectation”), from Proto-Indo-European *wen- (“to strive, love, want, reach, win”).
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