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Latest Surface tension Stories

2013-07-27 23:01:48

Easy science experiments and surface tension experiments have been published on Kids Activities Blog. Stop summer brain drain with these simple science experiments from seasoned Moms. Dallas, Texas (PRWEB) July 27, 2013 Easy science experiments and surface tension experiments have been published on Kids Activities Blog. Stop summer brain drain with these hands on and simple science experiments that can be easily done at home. Kids will turn on their brain and explore the wonderful world...

2013-07-16 23:20:14

A cool and easy surface tension science experiment has been published on Kids Activities Blog. What is surface tension and many more science questions can be studied will having a blast. Dallas, Texas (PRWEB) July 16, 2013 Science experiments make fun summer indoor activities for kids. The surface tension experiment lets kids discover the wonderful world of science while having a blast. What is surface tension? Kids will be able to explore this question with various elements. Surface...

New Ways To Study How Ordered Materials Arrange Themselves
2013-05-21 14:04:23

A fried breakfast food popular in Spain provided the inspiration for the development of doughnut-shaped droplets that may provide scientists with a new approach for studying fundamental issues in physics, mathematics and materials. The doughnut-shaped droplets, a shape known as toroidal, are formed from two dissimilar liquids using a simple rotating stage and an injection needle. About a millimeter in overall size, the droplets are produced individually, their shapes maintained by a...

Portable Diagnostics Designed To Be Shaken, Not Stirred
2012-05-09 08:13:37

As medical researchers and engineers try to shrink diagnostics to fit in a person's pocket, one question is how to easily move and mix small samples of liquid. University of Washington researchers have built and patented a surface that, when shaken, moves drops along certain paths to conduct medical or environmental tests. "This allows us to move drops as far as we want, and in any kind of layout that we want," said Karl Böhringer, a UW professor of electrical engineering...

2012-02-28 09:43:50

VTT researchers have shown that surface tension on a solid material is unconnected to the energy required to create a new surface. Consequently, surface tension on a solid does not exist in its conventional meaning. It is generally believed that an excess surface tension on a solid material exists, in similar manner to that on a liquid. This tension is described by the Shuttleworth equation, which was presented more than 60 years ago and is considered a fundamental equation of surface...

2011-08-03 21:58:11

New 3-D-nanostructured chip offers a litmus test for surface tension (and doubles as a carrier for secret messages) Materials scientists and applied physicists collaborating at Harvard's School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have invented a new device that can instantly identify an unknown liquid. The device, which fits in the palm of a hand and requires no power source, exploits the chemical and optical properties of precisely nanostructured materials to distinguish liquids by...

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2011-03-14 07:00:00

What do a wine glass on Earth and an International Space Station experiment have in common? Well, observing the wine glass would be one of few ways to see and understand the experiment being performed in space. Ever heard someone say their wine has "legs" or "tears of wine?" Wine legs or tears of wine is a phenomenon manifested as a ring of clear liquid that forms near the top of a glass above the surface of wine. The drops continuously form and fall in rivulets back into the liquid. One...

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2010-06-10 06:20:00

Scientists reported on Wednesday that bubbles do not just disappear when they pop, but actually deflate in a rapid cascade of bubbles. The physics behind this bursting effect seems to hold true whether the liquid is as thin as water or as thick as heavy oil, suggesting a universal theory of how bubbles behave when they break. According to the study published in the British journal Nature, a host of practical applications could follow in areas ranging from health care to climate to glass...

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2010-02-02 07:50:00

Could humans one day walk on walls, like Spider-Man? A palm-sized device invented at Cornell that uses water surface tension as an adhesive bond just might make it possible. The rapid adhesion mechanism could lead to such applications as shoes or gloves that stick and unstick to walls, or Post-it-like notes that can bear loads, according to Paul Steen, professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering, who invented the device with Michael Vogel, a former postdoctoral associate. The device is...

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2009-07-21 06:00:00

Scientists have long sought to explain why raindrops come in such a variety of different sizes, with prevailing wisdom saying the rain begins as tiny micro-droplets that join with nearby droplets as they fall to form even larger drops. However, after filming a single falling raindrop about six millimeters in diameter, French scientists now have an explanation for the wide variety of raindrop sizes. Using ultra-fast video footage, the researchers say the complex interaction between the drops...


Word of the Day
grass-comber
  • A landsman who is making his first voyage at sea; a novice who enters naval service from rural life.
According to the OED, a grass-comber is also 'a sailor's term for one who has been a farm-labourer.'