Quantcast

Latest Surveyor 3 Stories

Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Surveys Moon Landing Sites
2013-07-10 07:46:47

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Like the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), the Lunar Orbiter program's primary design function was to obtain images that would allow scientists and engineers to characterize the moon's surface in order to find safe and engaging landing sites for future missions. Five unmanned Orbiters were sent to the moon between 1966 and 1967, collectively photographing most of the lunar surface at 66 to 656 yards resolution. Some of Lunar...

88011938
2012-05-24 19:00:57

Lee Rannals for RedOrbit.com NASA announced guidelines established to try and protect lunar historic sites as engineers and scientists aim their sites for the moon. The new guidelines will be taken into account by the X Prize Foundation as it judges mobility plans submitted by 26 teams trying to become the first privately-funded entity to visit the moon. NASA said it recognizes that both nations and the companies have ambitions to reach the moon, so it wanted to develop the...

dc1e99ad4b37ed7f96f82cd501e37d20
2009-09-05 07:05:00

Four months after the success of Apollo 11, NASA launched Apollo 12 in November 1969. Almost exactly 40 years later, the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter has seen the landing site. Engineering and safety constraints in place for these earliest manned lunar missions dictated landing Apollo 12 at an equatorial site on a flat lava plain (known as maria on the moon). NASA selected a site near where the unmanned Surveyor 3 had landed two years earlier, in western Oceanus Procellarum. Of course,...

ec212b284f743a60c99b924c5db267cc1
2009-02-25 15:45:00

For the first time, a spacecraft from Earth has captured hi-resolution images of a solar eclipse while orbiting another world. Japan's Kaguya lunar orbiter accomplished the feat on Feb. 9, 2009, when the Sun, Earth and Moon lined up in a nearly perfect row. From Kaguya's point of view, Earth moved in front of the Sun, producing an otherworldly "diamond-ring" eclipse. The sequence begins in complete darkness. At first, Kaguya couldn't see the eclipse because it was blocked by the lunar...

abad7d6ed44524fa9b97fbb4fd04ff8f1
2008-06-23 10:40:00

Imagine landing on the Moon, climbing down the ladder of your spacecraft, and looking around the harsh lunar landscape"”to see another, older spacecraft standing only 200 yards away. That's exactly what happened in November 1969, when astronauts Pete Conrad and Alan Bean stepped out of the Apollo 12 lunar module. There, within walking distance on the edge of a small crater, stood Surveyor 3, an unmanned U.S. spacecraft that had landed in April 1967. Apollo 12's landing site had been...

2008-02-12 07:30:11

New research has revealed the seemingly gentle touchdowns of the six Apollo Lunar Modules (LMs) on the moon between 1969 and 1972 were actually incredibly violent events. The Lunar Module's descent engine blew out high-velocity lunar particles that strafed the landscape. "The smallest particles were seen by the Apollo astronauts to fly right out over the horizon and keep on going," said Philip Metzger of NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC). "Depending on the actual velocity they may have gone...

20fb23a22c39e648e8d052512b7860d11
2006-01-04 07:15:00

NASA -- The moon is utterly familiar. We see it all the time, in the blue sky during the day, among the stars and planets at night. Every child knows the outlines of the moon's lava seas: they trace the Man in the Moon or, sometimes, a Rabbit. This familiarity goes beyond appearances. The moon is actually made of Earth. According to modern theories, the moon was born some 4.5 billion years ago when an oversized asteroid struck our planet. Material from Earth itself spun out into space and...


Word of the Day
tesla
  • The unit of magnetic flux density in the International System of Units, equal to the magnitude of the magnetic field vector necessary to produce a force of one newton on a charge of one coulomb moving perpendicular to the direction of the magnetic field vector with a velocity of one meter per second. It is equivalent to one weber per square meter.
This word is named for Nikola Tesla, the inventor, engineer, and futurist.