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Latest Sweetness Stories

2008-07-29 09:00:55

SAN DIEGO, CA, July 29, 2008 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Senomyx, Inc. , a leading company focused on using proprietary technologies to discover and develop novel flavor ingredients for the food, beverage, and ingredient supply industries, announced today that it has initiated development activities for a new sucrose enhancer, S6973. Sucrose (otherwise known as common table sugar) is widely used in many food and beverage products. Taste tests have demonstrated that S6973 enables the...

2008-06-27 06:02:46

By Terry, Leon In the first of a six-part series from Cranfield University's Plant Science Laboratory, Dr Leon Terry looks at research on strawberry quality and using biosensors for fresh-produce quality assessment Strawberries are one of the most important horticultural crops grown in the UK. The rapid growth in sales over the past decade has been underpinned by ongoing research and development both in the UK and overseas. However, technology transfer between research establishments and...

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2008-06-10 14:10:05

Using the same concept behind commercial breath-freshening strips, a Temple University researcher has developed a new, easier method for clinical taste testing.Greg Smutzer, director of the Laboratory of Gustatory Psychophysics in the Biology Department of Temple's College of Science and Technology, has created taste strips similar to breath-freshening strips, but these edible strips contain one of the five basic tastes that are detected by humans "” sweet, sour, salty, bitter and...

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2008-03-26 14:25:00

The brain can sense the calories in food, independent of the taste mechanism, researchers have found in studies with mice. Their finding that the brain's reward system is switched on by this "sixth sense" machinery could have implications for understanding the causes of obesity. For example, the findings suggest why high-fructose corn syrup, widely used as a sweetener in foods, might contribute to obesity.Ivan de Araujo and colleagues published their findings in the March 27, 2008, issue of...

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2008-03-17 16:00:00

Similarities highlight environment's role in shaping evolution of taste preferencesAccording to researchers at the Monell Center, fruit flies are more like humans in their responses to many sweet tastes than are almost any other species. The diverse range of molecules that humans experience as sweet do not necessarily taste sweet to other species. For example, aspartame, a sweetener used by humans, does not taste sweet to rats and mice. However, fruit flies respond positively to most...

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2008-02-26 09:10:00

Primer describes current understanding of human taste perception and biologyDespite the significance of taste to both human gratification and survival, a basic understanding of this primal sense is still unfolding. Taste provides both pleasure and protection. Often taken for granted, the sense of taste evaluates everything humans put into their mouths. Taste mediates recognition of a substance and the final decision process before it is either swallowed and taken into the body, or rejected as...

2008-02-11 09:55:00

Cutting the connection between sweets and calories may confuse the body, making it harder to regulate intakeWASHINGTON "” Want to lose weight? It might help to pour that diet soda down the drain. Researchers have laboratory evidence that the widespread use of no-calorie sweeteners may actually make it harder for people to control their intake and body weight. The findings appear in the February issue of Behavioral Neuroscience, which is published by the American Psychological...

2005-11-07 13:40:00

A low-calorie sweetener that tastes like sugar and could help control diseases like diabetes and obesity may be closer to reality thanks to research published today. Scientists at The University of Manchester and The University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore have made a major advance in understanding what makes a substance taste sweet. The discovery could help pave the way for the development of low-calorie sweeteners that mimic natural sugar and leave no bitter aftertaste....

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2005-11-01 18:15:00

By Amy Norton NEW YORK -- The tongue may indeed have a taste for cheesecake, french fries and butter cookies, according to study published Tuesday. In experiments with rodents, French scientists identified a receptor on the tongue that appears to detect dietary fat. This counters the traditional view that the taste buds pick up only five basic flavors: sweet, sour, salty, bitter and "umami," -- a flavor associated with the food additive monosodium glutamate (MSG). The fact that the tongue...

2005-08-29 15:49:21

BETHESDA, Md. (August 29, 2005) "“ It's no secret that George Bush the Elder doesn't like broccoli. That he's not alone is no surprise. But the range of foods that many people won't eat because they are sensitive to "bitter" taste, or, in the case of non-sugar sweeteners, an "unacceptable aftertaste," is longer than you might think. These include spinach, lettuce and for some, even citrus fruits and juices. "This is not just an esthetic or parenting issue, but a major dietary and...


Word of the Day
negawatt
  • A unit of saved energy.
Coined by Amory Lovins, chairman of the Rocky Mountain Institute as a contraction of negative watt on the model of similar compounds like megawatt.