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Latest Sweetness Stories

2012-03-12 19:52:43

Animals live in surprisingly different sensory worlds Scientists from the Monell Center report that seven of 12 related mammalian species have lost the sense of sweet taste. As each of the sweet-blind species eats only meat, the findings demonstrate that a liking for sweets is frequently lost during the evolution of diet specialization. Previous research from the Monell team had revealed the remarkable finding that both domestic and wild cats are unable to taste sweet compounds due to...

2012-03-05 23:27:16

Does fat have a taste? About five years ago, animal studies first revealed the presence of entirely novel types of oral fat sensors or receptors on the tongue. Prior to this time, it was believed that fats were perceived only by flavor and texture cues. With this new information, “everything that we thought we knew about fat perception got turned on its head,” said Beverly Tepper, a professor in the Department of Food Science at Rutgers School of Environmental and Biological...

Fondness For Sweets Linked To Sweeter Personality
2011-10-27 05:25:59

Does having a sweet tooth make you a sweeter person? According to American researchers the answer could be Yes. Scientists from Gettysburg College, St. Xavier University in Chicago, and North Dakota State University found in a recent study that people who favored sugary foods were more inclined to volunteer, help others in need and are more agreeable than those who avoid eating sweets. The research, published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, focused on sweetness and...

2011-08-03 12:18:39

Protein inside taste cells turn off bitter taste New findings may lend insight into why some people are especially sensitive to bitter tastes. Scientists from the Monell Center and Givaudan Flavors have identified a protein inside of taste cells that acts to shorten bitter taste signals. They further report that mice lacking the gene for this taste terminator protein are more sensitive to bitter taste and also find it more aversive, possibly because they experience the taste for a longer...

2011-04-11 21:45:47

The mere taste of something extremely bitter"”even if you don't swallow it at all"”is enough to cause that dreaded feeling of nausea and to set your stomach churning, according to a new study reported in the April 12th issue of Current Biology, a Cell Press publication. "This work shows that our body and our physiology anticipate the consequences of foods we might eat, even if those foods contain toxins or anti-nutrients," said Paul Breslin of the Monell Chemical Senses Center and...

2011-03-31 08:52:40

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- We've all been guilty of passing up wholesome foods for better tasting, less nutritious ones at some point. With millions of adults and children avoiding those healthful foods because of the bitter taste, and gagging or vomiting when forced to take bitter liquid medicines, scientists reported a leap toward a high-tech version of Mary Poppins' solution.  It's not a spoonful of sugar to help the stuff go down . . . but a new and improved "bitterness blocker." "A lot...

2011-03-09 08:37:32

(Ivanhoe Newswire) "“ Why do we constantly crave that chocolate or those sweet tarts? Scientists have discovered that taste cells have several addition sugar detectors on top of the previously known sweet receptor. This could be a key step in developing strategies to limit overconsumption, according to this study. "Detecting the sweetness of nutritive sugars is one of the most important tasks of our taste cells," senior author Robert F. Margolskee, M.D., Ph.D., a molecular...

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2011-03-08 11:37:06

Multiple taste cell sensors contribute to detecting sugars A new research study dramatically increases knowledge of how taste cells detect sugars, a key step in developing strategies to limit overconsumption. Scientists from the Monell Center and collaborators have discovered that taste cells have several additional sugar detectors other than the previously known sweet receptor. "Detecting the sweetness of nutritive sugars is one of the most important tasks of our taste cells," said senior...

2010-12-20 14:27:00

WAYZATA, Minn., Dec 20, 2010 /PRNewswire/ -- The voice of native Minnesotan and aspiring singer-actor Therese Hegler is featured in the newly-launched national advertising campaign for Truvia(TM) natural sweetener. In an original tune sung by Hegler with an accompanying on-screen story, the 30-second commercial spots talk directly to the consumer about her relationship struggle with sweetness. "Playing the role of today's woman who fights the temptation of those moments where that 'donut...

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2010-12-15 06:00:00

The US government on Tuesday removed the artificial sweetener saccharin, long believed to potentially be a cancer-causing substance, from its list of hazardous substances. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) said the decision was made after studies found the white powdered substance that is 300 times sweeter than sugar "is no longer considered a potential" health hazard to humans. Saccharin, which is used to artificially sweeten thousands of low-calorie beverages and chewing gum, and...