Quantcast

Latest Sweetness Stories

2010-05-27 17:26:53

Researchers have discovered a chemical that specifically blocks people's ability to detect the bitter aftertaste that comes with artificial sweeteners such as saccharin. The key is a molecule known only as GIV3727 that specifically targets and inhibits a handful of human bitter taste receptors, according to a report published online on May 27th in Current Biology, a Cell Press publication. The finding of what the researchers say is the first commercially relevant small-molecule bitter taste...

96b9ce924d17e1cfd987f2834b1ba7eb
2010-03-08 09:40:00

There are five known tastes detected by the human tongue, -- sweet, salty, sour, bitter and umami (a protein-rich taste found in foods like soy sauce) -- but according to Australian researchers a sixth taste may soon be added to that list. "Through our study we can conclude that humans have a sixth taste -- fat," said Russell Keast, from Deakin University, on Monday. Researchers tested 30 people's ability to taste fatty acids placed in plain solutions and found that all of them were able to...

cc5bbf230eb6cdc7ac3421820b39cc241
2010-02-10 14:10:00

Individual differences in liking for sweetness based in part on underlying biology New research from the Monell Center reports that children's response to intense sweet taste is related to both a family history of alcoholism and the child's own self-reports of depression. The findings illustrate how liking for sweets differs among children based on underlying familial and biological factors. "We know that sweet taste is rewarding to all kids and makes them feel good," said study lead author...

eaa541f64fd6dbe0c36d8cb43152eaca1
2010-01-10 09:44:48

Calcium may not come to mind when you think of tasty foods, but in a study appearing in the January 8 issue of JBC, Japanese researchers have provided the first demonstration that calcium channels on the tongue are the targets of compounds that can enhance taste. In addition to molecules that directly trigger specific taste buds (salty, sweet etc.), there are other substances which have no flavor of their own but can enhance the flavors they are paired with (known as kokumi taste in Japanese...

2009-12-22 14:07:16

Endocannabinoid modulation of tongue sweet taste receptors may help control feeding behavior New findings from the Monell Center and Kyushu University in Japan report that endocannabinoids act directly on taste receptors on the tongue to enhance sweet taste. "Our taste cells may be more involved in regulating our appetites than we had previously known," said study author Robert Margolskee, M.D., Ph.D., a Monell molecular biologist. "Better understanding of the driving forces for eating and...

a7ffc8b632cbe812665c4536094546681
2009-10-16 13:40:00

Scientists have found out how people can taste the bubbly sensation from carbonated beverages. The answer appears to lie in an enzyme on the surface of sour-sensing cells in taste buds, researchers reported in the journal Science. Researchers at National Institutes of Health's National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) and colleagues from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) used mice in their study. Mice have a similar...

2009-08-04 08:00:00

SAN DIEGO, CA, August 4, 2009 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Senomyx, Inc. (Nasdaq: SNMX), a company focused on using proprietary taste receptor-based technologies to discover novel flavor ingredients for the food, beverage, and ingredient supply industries, today provided a corporate update and reported financial results for the second quarter ended June 30, 2009. A key recent accomplishment for the Company was the new collaborative research, development, commercialization and license...

2009-07-08 13:27:35

Using a combination of sensory, genetic, and in vitro approaches, researchers from the Monell Center confirm that the T1R1-T1R3 taste receptor plays a role in human umami (amino acid) taste.They further report that variations in the genes that code for this receptor correspond to individual variation in sensitivity to and perceived intensity of umami taste."These findings bolster our understanding of human taste variation and individual differences in tastes for essential nutrients," says...

2009-06-19 16:14:53

Researchers in Germany demonstrated the presence of several artificial sweeteners used in food and drink in waste water. Marco Scheurer, Heinz-Jurgen Brauch and Frank Thomas Lange of the Water Technology Center in Karlsruhe said a range of artificial sweeteners are commonly used in food and drinks, as well as drugs and sanitary products. Use of a new analytical method, the researchers were able to look for seven different artificial sweeteners -- cyclamate, acesulfame, saccharin, aspartame,...

2009-06-17 14:59:36

Sewage treatment plants fail to remove artificial sweeteners completely from waste water. What's more, these pollutants contaminate waters downstream and may still be present in our drinking water. Thanks to their new robust analytical method, which simultaneously extracts and analyses seven commonly used artificial sweeteners, Marco Scheurer, Heinz-Jrgen Brauch and Frank Thomas Lange from the Water Technology Center in Karlsruhe, Germany, were able to demonstrate the presence of several...


Word of the Day
abrosia
  • Wasting away as a result of abstinence from food.
The word 'abrosia' comes from a Greek roots meaning 'not' and 'eating'.