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Latest Sweetness Stories

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2009-10-16 13:40:00

Scientists have found out how people can taste the bubbly sensation from carbonated beverages. The answer appears to lie in an enzyme on the surface of sour-sensing cells in taste buds, researchers reported in the journal Science. Researchers at National Institutes of Health's National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) and colleagues from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) used mice in their study. Mice have a similar...

2009-08-04 08:00:00

SAN DIEGO, CA, August 4, 2009 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Senomyx, Inc. (Nasdaq: SNMX), a company focused on using proprietary taste receptor-based technologies to discover novel flavor ingredients for the food, beverage, and ingredient supply industries, today provided a corporate update and reported financial results for the second quarter ended June 30, 2009. A key recent accomplishment for the Company was the new collaborative research, development, commercialization and license...

2009-07-08 13:27:35

Using a combination of sensory, genetic, and in vitro approaches, researchers from the Monell Center confirm that the T1R1-T1R3 taste receptor plays a role in human umami (amino acid) taste.They further report that variations in the genes that code for this receptor correspond to individual variation in sensitivity to and perceived intensity of umami taste."These findings bolster our understanding of human taste variation and individual differences in tastes for essential nutrients," says...

2009-06-19 16:14:53

Researchers in Germany demonstrated the presence of several artificial sweeteners used in food and drink in waste water. Marco Scheurer, Heinz-Jurgen Brauch and Frank Thomas Lange of the Water Technology Center in Karlsruhe said a range of artificial sweeteners are commonly used in food and drinks, as well as drugs and sanitary products. Use of a new analytical method, the researchers were able to look for seven different artificial sweeteners -- cyclamate, acesulfame, saccharin, aspartame,...

2009-06-17 14:59:36

Sewage treatment plants fail to remove artificial sweeteners completely from waste water. What's more, these pollutants contaminate waters downstream and may still be present in our drinking water. Thanks to their new robust analytical method, which simultaneously extracts and analyses seven commonly used artificial sweeteners, Marco Scheurer, Heinz-Jrgen Brauch and Frank Thomas Lange from the Water Technology Center in Karlsruhe, Germany, were able to demonstrate the presence of several...

2009-06-02 15:59:00

Questions Put to Rest CHICAGO, June 2 /PRNewswire/ -- A just-published research review concludes that, media speculation aside, using aspartame as a sweetener has no effect on appetite or food intake. The same evaluation reaffirmed what regulators and health authorities have said many times before: aspartame is not associated with adverse effects for the population at large. "The conclusions should not be a surprise to health professionals, as they reflect what both science and common sense...

2009-06-01 11:58:00

Tate & Lyle will not appeal ITC decision; Voluntarily dismisses District Court case BREA, Calif., June 1 /PRNewswire/ -- Changzhou Niutang, one of the largest global manufacturers of sucralose, and its U.S. subsidiary, US Niutang, today announced that Tate & Lyle will not appeal the recent decision made by the U.S. International Trade Commission that decisively rejected Tate & Lyle's infringement allegations against Niutang. In addition, Tate & Lyle has requested a voluntary...

2009-04-16 13:40:07

U.S. scientists say they've determined the red panda is the first non-primate mammal to display a liking for the artificial sweetener aspartame. Monell Chemical Senses Center researchers in Philadelphia said the unexpected affinity for an artificial sweetener might reflect structural variation in the red panda's sweet-taste receptor and the findings might shed light on how taste preferences and diet choice are shaped by molecular differences in taste receptors. Greater insight into why we...

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2009-04-15 16:15:00

Preference for artificial sweeteners previously thought to exist only in Old World primates Researchers from the Monell Center report that the red panda is the first non-primate mammal to display a liking for the artificial sweetener aspartame. This unexpected affinity for an artificial sweetener may reflect structural variation in the red panda's sweet taste receptor. The findings may shed light on how taste preferences and diet choice are shaped by molecular differences in taste receptors....

2009-04-06 12:02:00

CHICAGO, April 6 /PRNewswire/ -- Ajinomoto Company Inc., the leading global supplier of aspartame, has applied to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for approval of Advantame, an innovative sweetener for use in foods and beverages. Advantame has a sweet, clean sugar-like taste. Because it is much sweeter than most low and non-calorie sweeteners currently available, it is anticipated to be a top candidate for food and beverage formulations. Heightened attention to the importance of healthy...


Word of the Day
glogg
  • Scandinavian punch made of claret and aquavit with spices and raisins and orange peel and sugar.
This word comes from the Swedish 'glogg,' which is an alteration of 'glodgat,' mulled (wine).
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