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Latest Symbiosis Stories

2011-08-15 00:00:04

Plants and fungi form complex underground networks to trade nutrients and sugars. A new study in the journal Science reveals that partners have evolved a sort of free market economy, allowing them to avoid "Ëœcheaters' and change their trading partners if they don't get a fair deal. Amsterdam, Netherlands (PRWEB) August 14, 2011 Dr. Toby Kiers and her colleagues are interested in how mutualisms "“ cooperative interactions among different species "“ evolve and persist....

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2011-08-11 13:57:59

By Dennis O'Brien, ARS A U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientist is trying to learn what is causing the decline in bumble bee populations and also is searching for a species that can serve as the next generation of greenhouse pollinators. Bumble bees, like honey bees, are important pollinators of native plants and are used to pollinate greenhouse crops like peppers and tomatoes. But colonies of Bombus occidentalis used for greenhouse pollination began to suffer from disease...

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2011-08-11 08:35:00

Max Planck researchers discover hydrogen-powered symbiotic bacteria in deep-sea hydrothermal vent mussels The search for new energy sources to power mankind's increasing needs is currently a topic of immense interest. Hydrogen-powered fuel cells are considered one of the most promising clean energy alternatives. While intensive research efforts have gone into developing ways to harness hydrogen energy to fuel our everyday lives, a natural example of a living hydrogen-powered 'fuel cell' has...

2011-08-10 22:54:17

From the kinds that people sneeze at, to the kinds that have prickly seeds that stick to pant legs, there are many different types of plants in grasslands around the world. According to a new analysis of plants in grassland ecosystems around the world, it turns out that most of those plant species are important. Brian Wilsey, associate professor, and Stanley Harpole, assistant professor, both in Iowa State University's Department of Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology, are authors...

2011-08-02 21:04:12

Soil-dwelling bacteria of the genus Frankia have the potential to produce a multitude of natural products, including antibiotics, herbicides, pigments, anticancer agents, and other useful products, according to an article in the June 2011 issue of the journal "Applied and Environmental Microbiology." University of New Hampshire professor of microbiology and genetics Louis Tisa, a Frankia expert, contributed the genomic analysis to this study. "We were able to use cutting-edge techniques to...

2011-07-28 23:19:02

The researchers discovered that a rainforest vine, pollinated by bats, has evolved dish-shaped leaves with such conspicuous echoes that nectar-feeding bats can find its flowers twice as fast by echolocation. The study is published today in Science. While it is well known that the bright colours of flowers serve to attract visually-guided pollinators such as bees and birds, little research has been done to see whether plants which rely on echolocating bats for pollination and seed dispersal...

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2011-07-22 11:55:58

Research leads to new "scaling" rule for abundance and production of animals Animal species all follow the same rule for how common they are in an ecosystem, scientists have discovered. And the rule is simple. Everything from birds to fishes, crabs to snails to worms, and the parasitic animals that live inside or on them, follows it. "You can predict how common something might be just by knowing its body weight--how big an individual is--and how high up the food chain it is," says biologist...

2011-07-13 23:33:57

Rice "“ which provides nearly half the daily calories for the world's population "“ could become adapted to climate change and some catastrophic events by colonizing its seeds or plants with the spores of tiny naturally occurring fungi, just-published U.S. Geological Survey-led research shows. In an effort to explore ways to increase the adaptability of rice to climatic scourges such as tsunamis and tidal surges that have already led to rice shortages, USGS researchers and their...

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2011-07-12 08:51:38

Ant colonies with more behavioral variety are more successful / New findings in ant behavioral research They attack other colonies, plunder and rob, kill other colonies' inhabitants or keep them as slaves: Ants are usually regarded as prototypes of social beings that are prepared to sacrifice their lives for their community, but they can also display extremely aggressive behavior towards other nests. The evolution and behavior of ants, in particular the relationship between socially...

2011-07-07 20:35:00

It seems we may have parasites to thank for the existence of sex as we know it. Indiana University biologists have found that, although sexual reproduction between two individuals is costly from an evolutionary perspective, it is favored over self-fertilization in the presence of coevolving parasites. Sex allows parents to produce offspring that are more resistant to the parasites, while self-fertilization dooms populations to extinction at the hands of their biological enemies. The July 8...


Latest Symbiosis Reference Libraries

Sebae Clownfish, Amphiprion sebae
2013-02-17 07:52:18

Image Credit: Miles Wu/Wikipedia (CC BY-SA 2.0) The sabae clownfish is a very rare species in the wild and is aggressive, especially as it matures. It is found in the northern Indian Ocean around India, Sri Lanka, Arabian Peninsula, Andaman Islands, Sumatra, Indonesia, and the Maldive Islands. This fish inhabits lagoons and coastal waters around reefs, at a depth range of 6 - 75 feet. This species of fish is the most popular fish for home aquariums. The body of the sabae clownfish is...

Saddleback Clownfish, Amphiprion polymnus
2013-02-09 09:11:17

Image Caption: Amphiprion polymnus at Tasik Ria House reef, North Sulawesi, Indonesia. Credit: Jens Peterson/Wikipedia (CC BY-SA 3.0) Saddleback clownfish are found in harbors and lagoons with a soft or sandy bottom, around reefs at depths from 6 - 90 feet. This fish is native to the Western Pacific, around China, Viet Nam, Gulf of Thailand, Indonesia, Philippines, northern Australia, New Guinea, New Britain, and the Solomon Islands. The body of the saddleback clownfish ranges in color...

Convict Blenny, Pholidichthys leucotaenia
2013-01-03 15:48:38

The convict blenny lives in tunnels around coastal reefs and in shallow lagoons of the Western South Pacific, mainly from the Philippines to the Solomon Islands. The young of this fish will often swim in schools around the reef heads and ledges so tightly packed together they will look like one organism. This species, sometimes called a blenny and sometimes called a goby, actually it is neither. It is in a classification alone with one other species called a worm blenny. The convict blenny...

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2011-02-23 17:28:19

The Polydnaviruses (PDV) are a family of insect viruses that contain two genera: Ichnoviruses (IV) and Bracoviruses (BV). The ichnoviruses occur in ichneumonid wasps and bracoviruses in braconid wasps. The virus is composed of multiple segments of double-stranded superhelical DNA packaged in capsid proteins and a double layer or single layer envelope. The full genome of the virus is integrated into the genome of the wasps and the virus only replicates in specific cells in the female...

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2005-09-12 10:19:57

The ants, one of the most successful groups of insects, are of particular interest because they form advanced colonies, and can constitute up to 15 percent of the total animal biomass of a tropical rainforest. They belong to the order Hymenoptera and are close relatives of the vespoid wasps. Ants appear in amber, found in central New Jersey, believed to be from the Cretaceous period. It is thought that they evolved from the wasps that had appeared during the Jurassic period. They are...

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Word of the Day
tesla
  • The unit of magnetic flux density in the International System of Units, equal to the magnitude of the magnetic field vector necessary to produce a force of one newton on a charge of one coulomb moving perpendicular to the direction of the magnetic field vector with a velocity of one meter per second. It is equivalent to one weber per square meter.
This word is named for Nikola Tesla, the inventor, engineer, and futurist.