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Latest Symmetry in biology Stories

Nudibranch
2014-10-02 03:00:55

Kim McDonald, UC San Diego The evolution of worms, insects, vertebrates and other “bilateral” animals—those with distinct left and right sides—from less complex creatures like jellyfish and sea anemones with “radial” symmetry may have been facilitated by the emergence of a completely new "operating system" for controlling genetic instructions in the cell. That’s the hypothesis of molecular biologists at UC San Diego. They report in the October 1 issue of the journal Genes...

2014-04-03 08:40:04

FORT COLLINS, Colo., April 3, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Apple(®) and Samsung(®) smartphones transform from tech tools to fashion accessories with the latest innovation from OtterBox(®), the No. 1-selling smartphone case in the United States.* Artful style and premium protection collide with Symmetry Series((TM)), now available for the iPhone(®) 5/5s, iPhone 5c and GALAXY S(®) 4. To view the multimedia assets associated with this release, please click:...

5-Limbed Brittle Stars Move Bilaterally, Like People
2012-05-10 04:47:57

Brainless organisms choose a central arm and head that way It appears that the brittle star, the humble, five-limbed dragnet of the seabed, moves very similarly to us. In a series of first-time experiments, Brown University evolutionary biologist Henry Astley discovered that brittle stars, despite having no brain, move in a very coordinated fashion, choosing a central arm to chart direction and then designating other limbs to propel it along. Yet when the brittle star wants to change...

2011-10-03 12:10:54

A research team at the Hubrecht Institute, Utrecht, demonstrates a mechanism by which left—right asymmetry in the body is established and maintained. The study, published in the open-access journal PLoS Genetics on September 29, offers a new model of how families of genes interact to promote and direct body asymmetry. Although organisms appear bilaterally symmetrical when observed from the outside, internal organs are positioned asymmetrically along the left—right axis, and the...

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2011-02-18 11:01:11

When people on airplanes ask Alan Newell what he works on, he tells them "flower arrangements." He could also say "fingerprints" or "sand ripples" or "how plants grow." "Most patterns you see, including the ones on sand dunes or fish or tigers or leopards or in the laboratory "“ even the defects in the patterns "“ have many universal features," said Newell, a Regents' Professor of Mathematics at the University of Arizona. "All these different systems exhibit strikingly similar...

2009-01-15 09:40:00

A tug-of-war between the two sides of the brain causes it to become asymmetrical, according to research published today in the journal Neuron. Asymmetry in the brain is thought to be important to enable the two hemispheres to specialise and operate more efficiently.Left-right asymmetry is present in the brains of most animals and is first evident at the time of early brain development. However, until now, scientists did not know the mechanisms that bring it about. Now, in a study funded...

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2008-12-22 09:25:00

Genes determining asymmetry probably arose in the first bilaterally symmetric organisms Biologists have tracked down genes that control the handedness of snail shells, and they turn out to be similar to the genes used by humans to set up the left and right sides of the body. The finding, reported online in advance of publication in Nature by University of California, Berkeley, researchers, indicates that the same genes have been responsible for establishing the left-right asymmetry of animals...


Latest Symmetry in biology Reference Libraries

Luidia sarsi
2013-08-12 10:57:03

Luidia sarsi is a species of starfish that is classified within the Luidiidae family. It can be found in a range that extends from the Mediterranean Sea to Norway and prefers a habitat in muddy or sandy areas. Adult individuals display pentaradial symmetry or pentamerism with five long arms that are bordered by bands of white spines that occur in groups of three. These arms reach a length of about 7.8 inches from tip to tip. This species is unique in that it develops differently than other...

Bathocyroe fosteri
2014-01-05 00:00:00

Bathocyroe fosteri is a species of lobate ctenophore found in all oceans around the world. It is typically found at intermediate depths and is very abundant near the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. This deep-sea comb jelly is named for Alvin (DSV-2) pilot Dudley Foster, who is credited with first collecting the specimens. This specimen measures about two inches tall and is bioluminescent. This species, as well as other ctenophores, reproduce sexually, with little to know self-fertilization known....

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Word of the Day
barghest
  • A goblin in English folklore, often appearing in the shape of a large dog and believed to portend imminent death or misfortune.
  • A ghost, wraith, hobgoblin, elf, or spirit.
The origin of 'barghest' is not known, but it may be from perhaps burh-ghest, town-ghost, or German Berg-geist (mountain spirit) or Bär-geist (bear-spirit).
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