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Latest Synesthesia Stories

Understanding How You See In The Dark
2013-10-31 09:00:19

University of Rochester Most people can see their body's movement in the absence of light Find a space with total darkness and slowly move your hand from side to side in front of your face. What do you see? If the answer is a shadowy shape moving past, you are probably not imagining things. With the help of computerized eye trackers, a new cognitive science study finds that at least 50 percent of people can see the movement of their own hand even in the absence of all light....

2013-09-03 10:26:41

In the perceptual condition known as synesthesia, unrelated sensory experiences such as color are triggered by ordinal stimuli such as numbers, letters and months of the year. Exactly how and why this happens is unknown. Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine, Rice University and the Jan and Dan Duncan Neurological Research Institute at Texas Children’s Hospital took a closer look at these connections and found a special relationship between the color and graphemes regions of the brain...

2011-11-23 11:30:39

In the 19th century, Francis Galton noted that certain people who were otherwise normal "saw" every number or letter tinged with a particular color, even though it was written in black ink. For the past two decades researchers have been studying this phenomenon, which is called synesthesia. In an "Unsolved Mystery" article and accompanying podcast to be published November 22 in the online, open-access journal PLoS Biology, David Brang and VS Ramachandran strive to bring synesthesia into the...

2011-11-18 03:03:09

Someone with the condition known as grapheme-color synesthesia might experience the number 2 in turquoise or the letter S in magenta. Now, researchers reporting their findings online in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on November 17 have shown that those individuals also show heightened activity in a brain region responsible for vision. The findings provide a novel way of looking at synesthesia as the product of regional hyperexcitability in the brain, the researchers say. They also...

2011-03-09 14:13:25

New brain imaging study reveals the structures that support color synesthesia The Nobel prize-winning physicist Richard Feynman once wrote in his autobiographical book (What do you care what other people think?): "When I see equations, I see letters in colors - I don't know why ["¦] And I wonder what the hell it must look like to the students." This neurological phenomenon is known to psychologists as synaesthesia and Feynman's experience of "seeing" the letters in color was a specific...

2010-11-16 22:14:57

Studies reveal brain underpinnings for auditory and visual illusions and everyday experiences New research indicates that the integration of senses and functions in the brain is common. About two percent of the population has a condition called synesthesia, in which two different sensations, like color and sound, are experienced at once. Although this condition is rare, the new findings suggest the brain is wired in complex and sometimes overlapping ways to help people interpret and...

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2010-11-12 08:03:42

They show that one of those genes in particular has a long evolutionary history, as evidenced by the fact that it plays a role in pain sensing in flies, mice and humans. At least in mice, the newly described gene is also linked to a condition known in humans as synesthesia, in which one sensory experience triggers the perception of another sense. "We found lots of new genes and pathways that have never been implicated in pain before," said Josef Penninger of the Institute of Molecular...

2009-12-17 14:37:58

For as many as 1 in 20 people, everyday experiences can elicit extra-ordinary associated sensations. The condition is known as synaesthesia and the most common form involves "seeing" colors when reading words and numbers. Many previous studies have shown that the brains of people who experience this phenomenon are different from those who do not and, in a new study reported in the February 2010 issue of Cortex (http://www.elsevier.com/locate/cortex), published by Elsevier, researchers from...


Word of the Day
holluschickie
  • A 'bachelor seal'; a young male seal which is prevented from mating by its herd's older males (mated bulls defending their territory).
This comes from the Russian word for 'bachelors.'
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