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Latest Synthetic fuel Stories

Diesel Produced By Bacteria On Demand
2013-04-23 10:01:06

University of Exeter It sounds like science fiction but a team from the University of Exeter, with support from Shell, has developed a method to make bacteria produce diesel on demand. While the technology still faces many significant commercialization challenges, the diesel, produced by special strains of E. coli bacteria, is almost identical to conventional diesel fuel and so does not need to be blended with petroleum products as is often required by biodiesels derived from plant oils....

Synthetic Fuel Could End US Reliance On Crude Oil
2012-12-06 09:22:03

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The United States has been relying on crude oil for more than a century. While it has played a vital role in driving modern innovation–transportation, plastics, detergents and even clothing–crude oil has also contributed to dangerous global warming. With the burgeoning threat of climate change, researchers from Princeton have outlined how the US could end reliance on petroleum and move to synthetic fuels. The US could...

Synthetic Gas Made From Air And Water
2012-10-20 09:57:58

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports — Your Universe Online Given the rising prices at the pumps, odds are most people have wished at one time or another that they could create gasoline out of thin air. Now, one British firm claims to have done just that. According to Reuters reporter Alice Baghdjian, engineers at Air Fuel Synthesis (AFS) in Teesside, England said that they have managed to produce synthetic gasoline using carbon dioxide extracted from air and hydrogen extracted from...


Word of the Day
siliqua
  • A Roman unit of weight, 1⁄1728 of a pound.
  • A weight of four grains used in weighing gold and precious stones; a carat.
  • In anatomy, a formation suggesting a husk or pod.
  • The lowest unit in the Roman coinage, the twenty-fourth part of a solidus.
  • A coin of base silver of the Gothic and Lombard kings of Italy.
'Siliqua' comes from a Latin word meaning 'a pod.'
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