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Latest syphilis Stories

2008-09-07 03:00:06

By Rushing, Elisabeth J Liappis, Angelike; Smirniotopoulos, James D; Smith, Alice B; Henry, James M; Man, Yan-Gao; Nelson, Ann M Abstract Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome represents a spectrum of clinicopathologic entities encountered in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients who have received highly active anti-retroviral therapy. The diagnosis is often challenging, treatment options are limited, and the prognosis is variable. To increase awareness and define the...

2008-09-06 03:00:05

By Guner, Fisun The latest display at the excellent Wellcome Collection is a haunting hotchpotch of skeletons. By Fisun Guner The air is chilly, the atmosphere is hushed, the lights are dimmed low: a gallery at the Wellcome Collection has been turned into a crepuscular tomb. In 26 neatly aligned glass coffins lie 26 recently excavated skeletons (27, if you count the 22-week-old foetus still in its mother's womb cavity). Yet this is no sensation-packed ghoulfest in the dire, dumbed-down...

2008-06-17 15:01:05

U.S. scientists studying syphilis bacteria say they have found genetic variations that could have significant clinical and epidemiological importance. Emory University researchers said sequence variations they identified in the acidic repeat protein gene allow straightforward differentiation of venereal syphilis from non-venereal Treponema pallidum subspecies. This finding can lead to improved diagnoses of cases, enabling doctors to prescribe the right treatment and public health workers...

2008-01-15 11:46:01

In 1492, Columbus sailed the ocean blue, but when he sailed back 'cross the sea, he may have spread a new disease — syphilis. The first recorded epidemic of syphilis happened during the Renaissance in 1495. Initially the plague broke out among the army of Charles the VIII after the French king invaded Naples. It then proceeded to devastate the continent. "Syphilis was a major killer in Europe during the Renaissance," said researcher George Armelagos, a skeletal biologist...

2006-07-12 19:05:01

By Maggie Fox, Health and Science Correspondent WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The growing U.S. prison population needs better and more organized protection from potential medical research abuses, a committee of experts said on Wednesday. There is little information on what kind of medical experiments are currently done on prisoners and parolees, the Institute of Medicine panel said. Given the "dark" history regarding such research, Congress should ensure better oversight, the experts...

2006-07-04 06:32:18

LONDON (Reuters) - The number of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) diagnosed in the UK continued to rise in 2005, with syphilis showing a 23 percent increase, the Health Protection Agency said on Tuesday. Cases of the most common STI, Chlamydia, increased 5 percent, but gonorrhea fell 13 percent, the second successive annual fall. Professor Peter Borriello, director of the HPA's Center for Infections, said that while the data on gonorrhea were welcome, the overall figures were...

2005-11-09 00:41:10

ATLANTA (Reuters) - The number of U.S. syphilis cases rose for the fourth straight year in 2004, fueled by increases among men, while the gonorrhea disease rate reached a historic low, federal health researchers said on Tuesday. The annual report on sexually transmitted diseases (STD) by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also showed a rise in chlamydia cases, but the increase is believed to reflect better screening and not a rise in new infections. The rate of...

2005-11-08 17:52:50

ATLANTA (Reuters) - The number of U.S. syphilis cases rose for the fourth straight year in 2004, fueled by increases among men, while the gonorrhea disease rate reached a historic low, federal health researchers said on Tuesday. The annual report on sexually transmitted diseases (STD) by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also showed a rise in chlamydia cases, but the increase is believed to reflect better screening and not a rise in new infections. The rate of...

2005-08-17 10:20:00

By Amy Norton NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Take-home antibiotics may be an effective way to ensure that the partners of men with certain sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) get treatment, a new study suggests. Researchers found that giving male STD patients a dose of antibiotics to bring to their partners appeared more effective than the traditional method for getting at-risk partners treated. Typically, people with STDs like chlamydia and gonorrhea are instructed to tell all their sexual...

2005-06-30 14:25:00

Knowledge of the Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis in the Negro Male (Tuskegee Study) does not increase distrust in medical care, according to researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Most of those surveyed were unaware of the Tuskegee Study and, of those who had heard of it, most could not accurately answer multiple-choice questions about the study. The researchers also found that African-Americans were significantly more likely than whites to be mistrustful...


Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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