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Latest Systems biology Stories

Biology’s Drive Toward Engineering
2013-06-06 19:38:57

American Chemical Society Biology is on the verge of getting its versions of the lever, wheel and axle, pulley and other basic machines that enable engineers to build almost any mechanical device, a new analysis has concluded. The viewpoint article on availability of this new toolkit – for engineering biological factories that can produce new biofuels, crops and chemicals, among others – appears in the journal ACS Synthetic Biology. Kevin Munnelly, CEO of synthetic biology...

2013-05-14 23:33:06

Collaboration connects gene expression data and physiological mechanistic model simulations that should illuminate best treatment for selected patients. San Mateo, CA (PRWEB) May 14, 2013 Entelos Holding Corp. (“Entelos” or “the Company”), a premier provider of physiological system modeling and services, and Seattle-based Institute for System Biology (ISB), the nonprofit pioneers of the systems approach to study the molecular causes of diseases, today announced the...

2013-05-01 10:38:27

Update to synthetic biology map identifies new activity across the globe The number of private and public entities conducting research in synthetic biology worldwide grew significantly between 2009 and 2013, according to the latest version of an interactive map produced by the Synthetic Biology Project at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. Synthetic biology, an area of research focused on the design and construction of new biological parts and devices, or the...

2013-04-22 16:57:31

Cells are the basic unit of a living organism. The human body consists of a vast array of highly specialized cells, such as blood cells, skin cells and neurons. In total more than 250 different cell types exist. How are the different types related to each other? Which factors are unique for each cell type? And what in the end determines the development of a certain cell? To answer these questions, the research team designed a computer-based method that uses already existing biological data...

2013-04-03 12:57:13

What effects will the rapidly growing field of synthetic biology have on the conservation of nature? The ecological and ethical challenges stemming from this question will require a new dialogue between members of the synthetic biology and biodiversity conservation communities, say Kent Redford of the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and Archipelago Consulting; Bill Adams of the University of Cambridge; and Georgina Mace of University College London (UCL) in a new paper published 2 April...

2013-02-04 14:46:46

By reproducing in the laboratory the complex interactions that cause human genes to turn on inside cells, Duke University bioengineers have created a system they believe can benefit gene therapy research and the burgeoning field of synthetic biology. This new approach should help basic scientists as they tease out the effects of "turning on" or "turning off" many different genes, as well as clinicians seeking to develop new gene-based therapies for human disease. "We know that human...

2013-02-01 13:19:16

Scientists report that they have developed a method that cuts down the time it takes to make new 'parts' for microscopic biological factories from 2 days to only 6 hours The scientists, from Imperial College London, say their research brings them another step closer to a new kind of industrial revolution, where parts for these biological factories could be mass-produced. These factories have a wealth of applications including better drug delivery treatments for patients, enhancements in...


Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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