Quantcast

Latest Systems ecology Stories

Dragonfly Study Shows How Ecosystem Changes Affect Biodiversity
2013-08-14 07:22:29

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Rice University researchers have found that communities in nature are likely to be a lot more sensitive to change than previously thought. The study findings, published in Nature Communications, points to a need for scientists concerned with human impact on the biosphere to take a different look at the consequences of altering the dynamics of a population. One example of such alteration would be removing large members of a species...

Secrets Of A Forest Revealed From One Tree's Architecture
2013-08-06 14:00:40

University of Arizona Behind the dazzling variety of shapes and forms found in trees hides a remarkably similar architecture based on fundamental, shared principles, UA ecologists have discovered. Researchers in the University of Arizona's department of ecology and evolutionary biology have found that despite differences in appearance, trees across species share remarkably similar architecture and can tell scientists a lot about an entire forest. Just by looking at a tree's branching...

2013-08-01 23:04:13

Chris Mickle joins Cardno, as Environmental Data Management and Information Solutions Practice Lead. Chris will refine and augment the firm’s direction for design and implementation of database practices, procedures, and software. Raleign North Carolina (PRWEB) August 01, 2013 Engineering and environmental consulting firm Cardno is pleased to welcome Environmental Database Practice Lead, Chris Mickle, to the firm. In this role, Chris will refine and augment the direction, design, and...

2013-07-31 10:30:29

Wildlife Conservation Society study finds impending economic growth and climate change impacts require long-term adaptation efforts to conserve Myanmar's unique biodiversity Long isolated by economic and political sanctions, Myanmar returns to the international community amid high expectations and challenges associated with protecting the country's great natural wealth from the impacts of economic growth and climate change. In a new study, scientists from the Wildlife Conservation...

Fungal Diversity Reduced By Traditional Forest Management
2013-07-26 13:21:05

Elhuyar Fundazioa In the beech groves of Navarre a team from the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country has analyzed the influence exerted by forestry management on the fungi populations that decompose wood There is a shortage of dead wood in forests because fallen branches and trees tend to be cleared away. This wood, if available, ought to be decomposing, as it is the habitat of many living beings like lignicolous fungi. These fungi are capable of decomposing dead wood and turning...

Hunting Threating Collapse of African Forests
2013-07-23 12:32:00

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Scientists from several universities are warning that current hunting trends in Africa could create complete ecological collapse for entire forest systems. A group from the Universities of Stirling, Oxford, Queensland and the Wildlife Conservation Society said the current rate of hunting of forest elephants, gorillas and other seed-dispersing species is unsustainable and threatens the ability of forest ecosystems to regenerate....

Fires Turn Boreal Forests Into Deciduous Woodlands
2013-07-23 09:27:55

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online One of the most flammable high-altitude regions of the world, a 2,000-square-kilometer zone in the Yukon Flats of interior Alaska has seen dramatic increases in both the frequency and severity of fires in recent decades. A research team led by the University of Illinois reports the area has seen higher wildfire activity more recently than at any other time in the past 10,000 years. The findings were reported...

2013-07-22 11:18:57

Deforestation in parts of Africa could be reversed with changes to land use, a study suggests. A more strategic approach to managing trees across the continent could have a positive impact on the changing climate, researchers say. A pioneering study of African savannas by the University of Edinburgh has revealed deforestation in south-central Africa, driven by rising populations in the aftermath of war, and increasing demand for trees for agriculture and fuel. This loss of forests...


Latest Systems ecology Reference Libraries

Rainforests
2013-04-19 19:33:20

Rainforests are forests that are characterized by high levels of rainfall, with definitions based on a minimum usual annual rainfall of about 68 to 78 inches. The monsoon trough, or otherwise known as the intertropical convergence zone, holds an important role in producing the climatic conditions that are essential for the Earth’s tropical rainforests. About 40 to 75 percent of all biotic species are native to the rainforests. It’s been estimated that there might be many millions of...

Taiga
2013-04-19 18:21:46

Taiga, or otherwise known as boreal forest, is a biome that is characterized by coniferous forests made up mostly of spruces, larches, and pines. The taiga is the world’s largest terrestrial biome. In North America, it covers most of inland Canada and Alaska as well as portions of the extreme northern continental United States and is known as the Northwoods. It covers most of Sweden, Finland, much of Norway, lowland/coastal areas of Iceland, much of Russia, northern Kazakhstan, northern...

Environmental Science
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Environmental science is a science that contains a wide range of scientific disciplines. These disciplines are grouped together based on the natural environment which they encompass and interact with. These sciences include physical, chemical, and biological components. Environmental science provides an interdisciplinary approach to the study of the environmental systems. The most common way environmental science is studied is through the work of one individual or small team drawing on the...

More Articles (3 articles) »
Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
Related