Quantcast
Specialized Immune Cells Could Stop Cancer Spread

Specialized Immune Cells Could Stop Cancer Spread

Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research Melbourne researchers have revealed the critical importance of highly specialized immune cells, called natural killer cells, in killing melanoma cells that have spread to the lungs. These...

Latest T cell Stories

2014-08-05 12:32:01

NEW YORK, Aug. 5, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Spring Mountain Capital, LP, a New York-based investment management firm, announced today that its private equity group structured and led a growth equity investment in IsoPlexis Corporation. IsoPlexis has developed a break-through single cell immunoassay and related software that provides in-depth understanding of immune and cancer cells. The Company's advanced cell assay can identify and characterize up to 45 secreted proteins from...

2014-07-16 12:39:43

Johns Hopkins Medicine Process suggests a new type of immunotherapy A team of researchers has devised a Pac-Man-style power pellet that gets normally mild-mannered cells to gobble up their undesirable neighbors. The development may point the way to therapies that enlist patients' own cells to better fend off infection and even cancer, the researchers say. A description of the work will be published July 15 in the journal Science Signaling. "Our goal is to build artificial cells...

Stopping Spread Of Cancer By Blocking Cells' Movement
2014-07-07 03:13:10

University College London Insights into how cells move through the body could lead to innovative techniques to stop cancer cells from spreading and causing secondary tumors, according to new UCL research. Scientists discovered that cells can change into an invasive, liquid-like state to readily navigate the narrow channels in our body. This transformation is triggered by chemical signals, which could be blocked in order to stop cancer cells from spreading. Most cancer deaths are not...

2014-07-07 09:51:49

Science in Public Some viruses can hide in our bodies for decades. They make ‘fake’ human proteins that trick our immune cells into thinking ‘everything is awesome’, there’s nothing to see here. Now researchers at the Imaging Centre of Excellence at Monash and Melbourne Universities have determined the basic structure of one of the two known families of these deceptive proteins. Using synchrotron light and working with a common virus that lives in people happily and for...

2014-06-30 15:18:06

Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute Cell's unique mutations used to trace history back to its origins in the embryo Researchers have developed new methods to trace the life history of individual cells back to their origins in the fertilized egg. By looking at the copy of the human genome present in healthy cells, they were able to build a picture of each cell's development from the early embryo on its journey to become part of an adult organ. During the life of an individual, all cells...

2014-06-27 14:56:01

German Cancer Research Center (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, DKFZ) A clinical phase I trial to examine the safety of the vaccine against gliomas based on mutant IDH1 in human patients is planned Astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas are subtypes of a brain cancer called 'glioma'. These incurable brain tumors arise from glial cells, a type of support cell found in the central nervous system. "Low-grade gliomas", which grow comparatively slowly, spread in a diffuse manner across the...

2014-06-05 13:21:24

VIB (the Flanders Institute for Biotechnology) Researchers at VIB and Ghent University have unraveled the mechanism of necroptosis. This is a type of cell death that plays a crucial role in numerous diseases, from viral infections and loss of auditory nerve cells to multiple sclerosis, acute heart failure and organ transplantation. Having detailed knowledge of the cell death process enables a targeted search for new drugs. Peter Vandenabeele (VIB/UGent): "The molecular mechanism of...

Surprising Similarities In The Way Immune System Defenders Bind To Disease-causing Invaders
2014-05-27 03:50:47

By Glenn Roberts Jr., Stanford University A study led by researchers at Stanford's School of Medicine reveals how T cells, the immune system's foot soldiers, respond to an enormous number of potential health threats. X-ray studies at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, combined with Stanford biological studies and computational analysis, revealed remarkable similarities in the structure of binding sites, which allow a given T cell to recognize many...

2014-05-26 13:21:07

University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center Peptide antibodies hit immune-response-stifling MDSCs without harming other vital cells Scientists have found a way to target elusive cells that suppress immune response, depleting them with peptides that spare other important cells and shrink tumors in preclinical experiments, according to a paper published online by Nature Medicine. "We've known about these cells blocking immune response for a decade, but haven't been able to shut...

2014-05-07 12:28:14

CINCINNATI, May 7, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- A new study in Nature challenges research data that form the scientific basis of clinical trials in which heart attack patients are injected with stem cells to try and regenerate damaged heart tissue. http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnvar/20110406/MM79025LOGO Researchers at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), report May 7 that cardiac stem cells used in ongoing clinical trials...


Latest T cell Reference Libraries

Thymus
2013-03-04 12:56:08

The thymus gland is an endocrine organ of the immune system located anteriolateral to the trachea and in between the lungs. Its primary function is to build T lymphocytes for the body’s immune system; therefore, it is most important during childhood and puberty, when it reaches its maximum size. After puberty, it will begin to atrophy and shrink in size. Old age generally brings about hypotrophy of the thymus. In children the thymus is grayish-pink in color and in adults it is yellow. On...

More Articles (1 articles) »
Word of the Day
endocarp
  • The hard inner (usually woody) layer of the pericarp of some fruits (as peaches or plums or cherries or olives) that contains the seed.
This word comes from the Greek 'endon,' in, within, plus the Greek 'kardia,' heart.
Related