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Latest T cell Stories

2012-03-14 20:46:55

Researchers at the RIKEN Omics Science Center (OSC) have successfully developed and demonstrated a new experimental technique for producing cells with specific functions through the artificial reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks. As an alternative to induced pluripotent stem cells, the technique promises to enable faster and more efficient production of functional cells for use in cancer therapy and a variety of other areas. Starting with the first-ever production of...

2012-03-14 12:46:43

Since the mid-1990s, doctors have had the protein Mer in their sights — it coats the outside of cancer cells, transmitting signals inside the cells that aid their uncontrolled growth. A University of Colorado Cancer Center study, recently published in the journal PLoS ONE, found another home for Mer — inside cancer cells´ nuclei — and perhaps another role for this protein that can point the way to novel, targeted treatments. “We´ve known that leukemic B...

2012-03-02 14:20:19

Upon fertilisation, a single cell is formed when egg and sperm fuse. Our entire body, with more than 200 specialised cell types and billions of cells are formed from this single cell. It is a scientific mystery how the early stem cells know what cell type to become, but a precise timing of the process is crucial for correct development and function of our body. Researchers across the world chase knowledge about our stem cells, as this knowledge holds great promises for development of...

2012-02-24 18:00:05

Cells that die naturally generate a lot of internal debris that can trigger the immune system to attack the body, leading to diseases such as lupus. Now Georgia Health Sciences University researchers report that an enzyme known to help keep a woman's immune system from attacking a fetus also helps block development of these autoimmune diseases that target healthy tissues, such as DNA or joints. The findings point toward new treatment strategies for autoimmune diseases, which are on the...

2012-02-13 13:17:30

2,000-year-old herb regulates autoimmunity and inflammation For roughly two thousand years, Chinese herbalists have treated Malaria using a root extract, commonly known as Chang Shan, from a type of hydrangea that grows in Tibet and Nepal. More recent studies suggest that halofuginone, a compound derived from this extract's bioactive ingredient, could be used to treat many autoimmune disorders as well. Now, researchers from the Harvard School of Dental Medicine have discovered the...

2012-02-08 14:50:52

Immunological diseases, such as eczema and asthma, are on the increase in westernised society and represent a major challenge for 21st century medicine. A new study has shown, for the first time, that growing up on a farm directly affects the regulation of the immune system and causes a reduction in the immunological responses to food proteins. The research, led by the University of Bristol's School of Veterinary Sciences, found that spending early life in a complex farm environment...

2012-01-27 11:26:53

SENP1 prevents crucial gene-activator STAT5 from becoming trapped in nucleus When SUMO grips STAT5, a protein that activates genes, it blocks the healthy embryonic development of immune B cells and T cells unless its nemesis breaks the hold, a research team led by scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reports today in Molecular Cell. "This research extends the activity of SUMO and the Sentrin/SUMO-specific protease 1 (SENP1) to the field of immunology, in...

2012-01-25 12:45:20

Leukemic cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (L-CTCL) is a leukemia arising from T-cells, a type of white blood cell. This cancer can involve the skin and other organs, and patients often die within three years. Rachael A. Clark, MD, PhD, BWH assistant professor of dermatology and associate dermatologist and Thomas Kupper, MD, BWH Department of Dermatology chairman and their colleagues now report a new study that low-dose Campath (alemtuzumab) not only treats patients with L-CTCL but does so without...


Latest T cell Reference Libraries

Thymus
2013-03-04 12:56:08

The thymus gland is an endocrine organ of the immune system located anteriolateral to the trachea and in between the lungs. Its primary function is to build T lymphocytes for the body’s immune system; therefore, it is most important during childhood and puberty, when it reaches its maximum size. After puberty, it will begin to atrophy and shrink in size. Old age generally brings about hypotrophy of the thymus. In children the thymus is grayish-pink in color and in adults it is yellow. On...

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Word of the Day
siliqua
  • A Roman unit of weight, 1⁄1728 of a pound.
  • A weight of four grains used in weighing gold and precious stones; a carat.
  • In anatomy, a formation suggesting a husk or pod.
  • The lowest unit in the Roman coinage, the twenty-fourth part of a solidus.
  • A coin of base silver of the Gothic and Lombard kings of Italy.
'Siliqua' comes from a Latin word meaning 'a pod.'
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