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Latest Tamarix Stories

2014-09-05 16:23:12

LAS VEGAS, Sept. 5, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Tamarisk Technologies Group, LLC, a technology development company engaged in the development of innovative drug delivery technology, announced last week that it has added Dr. Mel Affrime to the Tamarisk team as Director of Scientific Affairs. "We are excited to have Mel on the Tamarisk team," says Dean Crowell, Executive Director of Tamarisk Technologies Group. "His experience and expertise in global clinical research and development will...

Invasive Species Abound In The River Thames
2012-10-10 05:02:07

Alan McStravick for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study out of the U.K. points out what many ecosystems of the world have already known. In this new study, scientists from the Queen Mary, University of London, claim that almost 100 non-native freshwater species have successfully invaded the River Thames, making it one of the world´s most highly invaded freshwater systems. Published in the journal Biological Invasions over the weekend, scientists suggest that previous...

2011-03-03 12:23:14

Simply by eating the leaves of an invasive tree that soaks up river water, an Asian beetle may help to slow down water loss in the Southwestern United States. Two scientists from UC Santa Barbara, working with colleagues from the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, have published the first substantive data showing water savings that can result from using Asian beetles for the biological control of tamarisk, an invasive tree of western rivers. The study is now...

2010-05-25 13:29:00

WILKESBORO, N.C., May 25 /PRNewswire/ -- Tamarisk Technologies has developed a new plastic that is biodegradable in about 60 days. Tests conducted by both Tamarisk Technologies and Intertek Labs, an independent third party laboratory, have shown that this plastic technology may be the answer to the world's need for a biodegradable and compostable plastic. "This is a truly revolutionary breakthrough; it looks and feels like the plastic I have seen all my life, but the difference is that...

2009-09-16 13:07:32

The U.S. Forest Service says computer models suggest tamarisk -- an aggressive invasive plant -- will likely expand its habitat if the climate changes. Scientists at the Forest Service's Pacific Northwest Research Station say if projected warming trends are realized, one of the nation's most aggressive exotic plants will invade more U.S. land area. Results of our study suggest that a little over 20 percent of the Northwest east of the Cascade Mountains supports suitable tamarisk habitat, but...

2009-09-16 06:58:21

Models show habitat of the aggressive invasive plant likely will expand as temperature warms If the future warming trends that scientists have projected are realized, one of the country's most aggressive exotic plants will have the potential to invade more U.S. land area, according to a new study published in the current issue of the journal Invasive Plant Science and Management. The study found that tamarisk"”prevalent today in some parts of the region, but generally limited to warm...

2009-08-10 12:26:56

A leaf-eating Chinese beetle is the newest ally in the fight to rid Colorado of an invasive weed threatening native life, a state agriculture official says. Dan Bean, the Colorado Department of Agriculture's director of biological pest control, said 100,000 yellow-striped Diorhabda beetles have already been released along the Arkansas River to help contain the spread of a voracious weed called tamarisk, The Denver Post said Monday. We want them to feed like crazy, Bean said of the beetles. An...

2008-08-04 09:00:31

By Dan England, Greeley Tribune, Colo. Aug. 4--Tina Booton keeps a tamarisk tree near her cubicle in the Weld County Public Works Department. Someone with a sick sense of humor could say it was pulled from the ground and displayed as an example to show what happens when you mess with Weld County's weed dictatorship. The tamarisk, after all, is as noxious as they come, a plant that's invaded Grand Junction and other parts of the Western Slope and continues to annoy Weld weeders, too....

2008-07-19 12:00:00

By Chris Woodka, The Pueblo Chieftain, Colo. Jul. 19--The Arkansas River basin has the greatest tamarisk infestation of any basin in the state, but has so far received relatively meager state and federal funding to combat the problem. The Southeastern Colorado Water Conservancy District wants to change that by developing the Arkansas Watershed Invasive Plant Plan, an approach that looks at the entire basin, not just spotty projects to remove tamarisk. "The Colorado River basin has 8...

2007-04-21 12:00:13

By Chris Woodka, The Pueblo Chieftain, Colo. Apr. 21--Tamarack trees are not native to the Arkansas Valley and few, if any, grow here. Tamarisks, or salt cedars, are a growing threat to water supplies, channel capacity and plant diversity in the Arkansas Valley. Confusion persists, as in a recent "Tell It To The Chieftain" submission, about the two species. Arkansas Valley natives have for generations called salt cedars "tamarack," adding to the confusion. The tamarack tree, a...


Word of the Day
reremouse
  • A bat.
The word 'reremouse' comes from Middle English reremous, from Old English hrēremūs, hrērmūs ("bat"), equivalent to rear (“to move, shake, stir”) +‎ mouse.
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