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Latest TAT Stories

b5e18d559c1a998d1054d8eeccf5f69d1
2008-11-15 08:57:06

Scientists have unraveled in unprecedented detail the cascade of events that go wrong in brain cells affected by HIV, a virus whose assault on the nervous system continues unabated despite antiviral medications that can keep the virus at bay for years in the rest of the body. The new research reveals key steps taken in the brain by Tat, a protein that is central to HIV's attack on cells called neurons. Researchers discovered the receptor that Tat uses to attack neurons, and they were able to...

2008-10-28 18:00:28

WASHINGTON and RICHMOND, Calif., Oct. 28 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Sangamo BioSciences, Inc. announced today the presentation of data demonstrating that human CD4 T-cells can be made permanently resistant to HIV infection by treatment with zinc finger DNA-binding protein nucleases (ZFN(TM)) resulting in an increase in CD4 T-cell counts and a reduction in viral load in an animal model of HIV infection. The presentation, entitled, "Establishment of HIV Resistant CD4 T-cells Using Engineered...

2008-10-26 12:00:20

Panacos Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (NASDAQ: PANC), a biotechnology company dedicated to developing the next generation of antiviral therapeutic products, today announced that data from the Company's Phase 2b study of bevirimat, Panacos' lead HIV-1 Gag maturation inhibitor, was shown in an oral presentation at the Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC) in Washington, DC. The key findings from Study 203 demonstrated that bevirimat appeared safe and effective in both...

2008-08-04 12:01:30

Theratechnologies (TSX: TH) today announced positive data related to body image for patients treated with tesamorelin in both its first and confirmatory Phase 3 clinical trials, in two poster presentations at the XVII International AIDS Conference in Mexico City, Mexico. Body image parameters are considered an important secondary endpoint and a clinical benefit of both Phase 3 studies. The Company will also sponsor a symposium entitled "Body Fat Changes and Metabolic Complications in the...

78eba79291bd4015b7fdd923b80f4c471
2008-07-17 16:35:00

New research has found that a gene variant may make Africans more vulnerable to HIV infection, while also helping them live longer once infected. The genetic variation originated thousands of years ago to protect Africans from malaria, the researchers said Wednesday. The gene involved in the study controls a surface protein on red blood cells. Those with the genetic variation were found to have a 40 percent higher risk of becoming infected with HIV, researchers in the United States and...

2008-06-30 09:03:37

RICHMOND, Calif., June 30 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Sangamo BioSciences, Inc. announced today the publication of data demonstrating that human immune system cells (CD4 T-cells) can be made resistant to HIV infection by treatment with zinc finger DNA-binding protein nucleases (ZFN(TM)). The data suggest that the ZFN approach, which results in the permanent modification of the CCR5 gene encoding an important receptor for HIV infection, is a promising strategy for the treatment of HIV/AIDS....

a112651ce9f845e43f232fe94a8a89dc1
2008-03-17 16:41:50

Scientists have known for more than a decade that a protein associated with the HIV virus is good at crossing cell membranes, but they didn't know how it worked. A multidisciplinary team from the University of Illinois has solved the mystery, and their findings could improve the design of therapeutic agents that cross a variety of membrane types.A paper describing their findings appears this month in Angewandte Chemie.The TAT protein transduction domain of the HIV virus has some remarkable...

2008-01-31 16:55:00

Researchers seek to deny HIV its safe havens in the human body A drug already used to treat parasitic infections, and once looked at for cancer, also attacks the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in a new and powerful way, according to research published today online in the open access journal Retrovirology. Past research has established that HIV has "learned" to hide out in certain human cells where it is safe from the body's counterattack, cells that come to serve as viral reservoirs....

2007-07-17 09:04:10

DES PLAINES, Ill., July 17 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Since the first diagnostic test for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) came on the market in 1985, public health authorities have been concerned about HIV's ability to mutate and create new strains of subtypes that may elude detection. While many of the variant strains of HIV are not as prevalent in the United States as other countries, studies suggest that the influx of immigrants from countries where these strains are more common is...

2006-02-06 15:17:46

By Maggie Fox, Health and Science Correspondent DENVER (Reuters) - Which particular kind of HIV virus an AIDS patient has may be more important than other factors in how quickly death comes, U.S. and Ugandan researchers reported on Monday. They found that people infected with a clade, or subtype, of HIV called D died more quickly that those with infections from the A clade. Clade was a better predictor than viral load -- how much virus can be found in a patient's blood -- of rapid...