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Last updated on April 19, 2014 at 17:21 EDT

Latest Teasing Stories

2014-03-30 23:00:38

NoBullying.com, releases today the Amanda Todd Story http://nobullying.com/amanda-todd-story/. London, UK (PRWEB) March 30, 2014 When Amanda Todd posted a video on Youtube with the use of flash cards, it seemed like a cry for help, she told the story of being abused, bullied and victimized online and in person, she narrated her silent story of torture, drug abuse and alcohol abuse to silence her pain stemming from Cyber Bullying. She was desperate for someone to understand her, listen to...

Anti-bullying Efforts May Boost Physical Fitness
2014-01-17 08:16:04

Brigham Young University A new study found that children who were bullied during P.E. class or other physical activities were less likely to participate in physical activity one year later. Overweight or obese children who experienced teasing during physical activity had a lower perceived health-related quality of life (referring to physical, social, academic and emotional functioning) one year later. Even children with a healthy weight who were bullied during physical activity tended...

2010-04-15 07:15:00

LUBBOCK, Texas, April 15 /PRNewswire/ -- Most every child has experienced some kind of teasing in their life, and Ima Nobody is no exception. In Ima Nobody Becomes Somebody by Brenda Poage, Ima, a quirky but lovable first-grader, attempts to conquer her bullies and go from a nobody to a somebody. Ima is a little girl who doesn't quite look like everyone else. With bright red hair, a smattering of freckles, a gap between her teeth and long, awkward legs, it isn't just Ima's strange name...

2009-04-07 09:30:00

Teasing can make you feel unique, loved, and closer to other people WASHINGTON, April 7 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Teasing can be a positive experience for children as it teaches them how to show affection and deal with conflict. Teasing requires an understanding of balance and it takes two willing participants for it to be done well, according to new research appearing in Communication Currents, an online publication of the National Communication Association. A form of play in families,...

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2006-02-06 11:20:00

By Amy Norton NEW YORK -- Children who are teased about their weight may try to shed pounds in any number of unhealthy ways, a study published Monday shows. The study, which followed a group of U.S. middle school and high school students for five years, found that those who'd been teased about their weight were more likely to try fasting, skipping meals, vomiting, or using diet pills or laxatives. They were also at greater risk of binge eating -- a problem that is linked to depression, which...