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The Evolution Of Jaws Based On A 325M-Year-Old Shark-Like Fossil
2014-04-17 07:20:53

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Despite having retained their basic "sharkiness" for millions of years, modern sharks have less to tell us about the early evolution of jawed vertebrates—including humans—than was previously thought. A new study led by the American Museum of Natural History, based on the skull of a newly discovered 325-million-year-old shark-like species, reveals that modern sharks are quite evolutionarily advanced when compared to early...

New Species Of Marine Fish From The Devonian Period Discovered In Teruel
2013-06-03 18:50:57

FECYT - Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology Researchers from the University of Valencia and the Natural History Museum of Berlin have studied the fossilized remains of scales and bones found in Teruel and the south of Zaragoza, ascertaining that they belong to a new fish species called Machaeracanthus goujeti that lived in that area of the peninsula during the Devonian period. The fossils are part of the collection housed in the Palaeontology Museum of Zaragoza. In the journal...

Evolution Of Hips Simpler Than Suspected
2013-05-15 12:04:37

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The evolutionary path from the bone structure of the fish to the complex, weight-bearing hips of walking animals was a much simpler process than previously thought, according to a new study. About 395 million years ago, the first tetrapods, or four-legged animals, stepped onto land. This transition was accomplished using strong, weight-bearing hipbones and a connection through the spine via the ilium. These features were not present...

Study Reveals First Ever Images Of Early Tetrapod Backbone And How It Helped In Land Evolution
2013-01-14 08:07:38

[Watch Video: 3D X-Ray Images Of Early Tetrapod Backbone] Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Using high-energy X-rays and a new data extraction protocol, an international consortium of scientists have for the first time rendered a 3D model of a prehistoric tetrapod backbone. The new reconstruction has shed new light on how the early animals moved once they made it onto land. One of the main creatures studied was a fierce-looking ichthyostega that lived from 374...

2012-04-25 07:43:21

Here's an anatomical packing list for making that historic trip from water to land circa 370 million years ago: Lungs? Check. Legs? Check. Patches of highly vascular bone in the skin? In a new paper, scientists propose why many of the earliest four-legged creatures that dared breathe on land carried bony skin features. The "dermal bones" within the skin, especially the bones covering the skull roof and forming part of the shoulder girdle, had a highly complex surface of ridges and furrows...

2011-12-28 07:46:39

University of Oregon scientist finds evidence that the transition occurred in humid, wooded floodplains A small fish crawling on stumpy limbs from a shrinking desert pond is an icon of can-do spirit, emblematic of a leading theory for the evolutionary transition between fish and amphibians. This theorized image of such a drastic adaptation to changing environmental conditions, however, may, itself, be evolving into a new picture. University of Oregon scientist Gregory J. Retallack,...

African Lungfish Research Hints At New Evolutionary Step
2011-12-13 13:44:14

Researchers have revealed that the African lungfish can use its thin pelvic limbs to propel itself forward. The team's discovery reshuffles the order of evolutionary events leading up to creatures being able to walk, and also suggests that fossil tracks long thought to be the work of early tetrapods could have been produced instead by lobe-finned ancestors of the lungfish. "In a number of these trackways, the animals alternate their limbs, which suggested that they must have been made...

2011-10-05 12:52:59

A study into the muscle development of several different fish has given insights into the genetic leap that set the scene for the evolution of hind legs in terrestrial animals. This innovation gave rise to the tetrapods–four-legged creatures, and our distant ancestors–that made the first small steps on land some 400 million years ago. A team of Australian scientists led by Professor Peter Currie, of the Australian Regenerative Medicine Institute at Monash University, and Dr...

2011-07-07 00:38:56

New data on the initial diversification of jaws sheds light on early vertebrate feeding ecology More than 99 per cent of modern vertebrates (animals with a backbone, including humans) have jaws, yet 420 million years ago, jawless, toothless armour-plated fishes dominated the seas, lakes, and rivers. There were no vertebrates yet on land and the recently evolved jawed fishes were minor players in this alien world, some sporting unusual jaw shapes and structures that bear little physical...

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2009-07-07 06:45:00

Nearly everyone can recall the high school textbook illustrations of the planet's first land-dwelling creatures, ubiquitously represented as comic-looking fish with short, stumpy legs.  A team of paleontologists, however, are challenging these standard depictions, saying that the earth's first tetrapods were for more diverse than previously suspected. "Some looked like crocodiles, some looked like little lizards, some like moray eels, and some were snake-like," explained Jennifer Clack...


Word of the Day
snash
  • To talk saucily.
  • Insolent, opprobrious language; impertinent abuse.
This word is Scots in origin and probably imitative.