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Latest Tempel Stories

2005-09-06 18:15:00

Comet Tempel 1, source of NASA’s July 4 fireworks, is coated in a powdery layer of dust and bears evidence of other celestial collisions, according to first results from the Deep Impact mission published in Science and presented at the Division for Planetary Sciences meeting. Peter Schultz, professor of geological sciences at Brown University, was a co-investigator on the mission team.

2005-09-06 15:35:00

By Deborah Zabarenko WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Comet Tempel 1, the target of NASA's Deep Impact probe, turns out to be quite fragile, with no more substance than a snowbank, scientists said on Tuesday.

2005-06-23 19:30:00

When comet Tempel 1 collides with a NASA space probe in the early morning hours of July 4, 2005, scientists at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory expect some holiday sizzle – a brilliant flash and a dramatic spray of debris.


Latest Tempel Reference Libraries

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2009-04-28 19:02:44

Ernst Wilhelm Leberecht Tempel was born on December 4, 1821 in Germany and died March 16, 1889. Tempel worked in Marseille until the onset of the Franco Prussian War in 1870 at which time he relocated to Italy. Tempel discovered or assisted in discovering 21 comets. The Tempel asteroid 3808 and lunar crater Tempel are named in his honor. His most notable discoveries include the following asteroids 564 Angelina, 65 Cybele, 74 Galatea, 81 Terpsichore and 97 Klotho.

0_c47c1e1ef4be232682b2419b8dcade37
2009-04-28 18:59:52

Ernst Wilhelm Leberecht Tempel was born on December 4, 1821 in Germany and died March 16, 1889. Tempel worked in Marseille until the onset of the Franco Prussian War in 1870 at which time he relocated to Italy. Tempel discovered or assisted in discovering 21 comets. The Tempel asteroid 3808 and lunar crater Tempel are named in his honor. His most notable discoveries include the following asteroids 564 Angelina, 65 Cybele, 74 Galatea, 81 Terpsichore and 97 Klotho.

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Word of the Day
pawl
  • A pivoted catch designed to fall into a notch on a ratchet wheel so as to allow movement in only one direction (e.g. on a windlass or in a clock mechanism), or alternatively to move the wheel in one direction.
The word 'pawl' probably comes from a Latin word meaning 'stake'.
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