Quantcast

Latest Tendons Stories

2013-05-22 23:25:03

Tips for senior runners for minimizing foot injury Carmel, NY (PRWEB) May 22, 2013 Speeding up can slow the effects of aging and mortality. According to a recent study from Bispebjerg University Hospital in Denmark published in the American Journal of Epidemiology, April 2013, the risk of death was reduced by 44% for male joggers and 44% for female joggers, with an adjusted survival benefit of 6.2 years in men and 5.6 years in women. The results reinforced findings from an earlier Stanford...

2013-02-12 14:47:33

New research in The FASEB Journal, based on carbon-14 dating, shows that despite repeated high-impact loading, the Achilles tendon is not renewed, but stays the same throughout adult life Notorious among athletes and trainers as career killers, Achilles tendon injuries are among the most devastating. Now, by carbon testing tissues exposed to nuclear fallout in post WWII tests, scientists have learned why: Like our teeth and the lenses in our eyes, the Achilles tendon is a tissue that does...

2012-05-23 23:01:09

Dr. Bill Releford Successfully Treats Chronic Achilles Tendonitis and Retrocalcaneal Bursitis with Platelet Rich Plasma Therapy (P.R.P.) in Olympic Hopeful Antonette Carter Beverly Hills, CA (PRWEB) May 22, 2012 Dr. Bill J. Releford, DPM, medical director and founder of the Releford Foot and Ankle Institute, announced today that usage of platelet rich plasma therapy (P.R.P.) can be beneficial in the treatment of chronic achilles tendonitis and retrocalcaneal bursitis. The patient was...

2010-01-12 17:32:06

More than a third of National Football League (NFL) players who sustained an Achilles tendon injury were never able to return to professional play according to research in the current issue of Foot & Ankle Specialist (published by SAGE). The injured players who did return to active play averaged a 50% reduction in their power ratings. The aim of the study was to document the epidemiology of Achilles tendon ruptures in the NFL and to quantify the impact of these injuries on player...

7e828ea44e5a0b27f1953b827cc205731
2009-07-07 15:13:06

A new study finds that age, training or participation in high impact sports do not appear to be a factor in the development of Achilles tendon problems among older athletes. Pain in the Achilles tendon, which connects the calf muscle to the heel bone, typically results from small tears or swelling in the tendon.  Such "overuse" injury is often characterized by swelling and pain when rising onto the toes or pushing off when walking.  The precise cause is unknown. Dr. Nicola Maffulli...

2008-09-01 15:00:21

DEAR DR. DONOHUE: I am a reasonably fit, 61-year-old male who exercises several times a week by walking and the use of Nautilus equipment. I am 5 feet, 8 inches tall and weigh 170 pounds. I recently ruptured my Achilles tendon while jogging across a parking lot to my car in a futile attempt to stay dry during one of our frequent rain storms. How could this happen? I wasn't doing anything I haven't done many times before. I regularly use the calf machine and lift almost the full stack of...

2006-03-14 14:37:39

By Megan Rauscher NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - A painful Achilles tendon could be a sign of an inherited tendency to have high cholesterol, which carries a high risk of early heart disease, UK researchers say. Wider recognition of the link between Achilles tendon pain and so-called "heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia" -- or HeFH -- could lead to earlier diagnosis of this disorder, the team reports in the Annals of Rheumatic Disease. In comments to Reuters Health, principal...

2006-02-17 15:35:00

By Amy Norton NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Anti-inflammatory painkillers like ibuprofen and naproxen may be ineffective in many cases of tendon injury, according to researchers. Pain relievers known collectively as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs, are often used to treat sore muscles and joints because the body's inflammatory reaction to injury contributes to pain. However, UK researchers write in a new report, there is no reason to believe that NSAIDs aid tendon injuries known...


Word of the Day
jument
  • A beast of burden; also, a beast in general.
'Jument' ultimately comes from the Latin 'jugum,' yoke.
Related