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Latest Teosinte Stories

2012-04-24 23:16:53

In a variant of maize known as pod corn, or tunicate maize, the maize kernels on the cob are not ‘naked’ but covered by long membranous husks known as glumes.

2011-09-26 13:08:46

Corn split off from its closest relative teosinte, a wild Mexican grass, about 10,000 years ago thanks to the breeding efforts of early Mexican farmers.

2011-08-03 13:05:01

When an animal gets too hot or too cold, or feels pangs of hunger or thirst, it tends to relocate – to where it’s cooler or hotter, or to the nearest place where food or water can be found.

2009-10-03 12:36:20

Study on maize domestication may help improve crop yields.

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2009-03-24 08:00:00

The earliest physical evidence for domesticated maize, what some cultures call corn, dates to at least 8,700 calendar years ago, and it was probably domesticated by indigenous peoples in the lowland areas of southwestern Mexico, not the highland areas.

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2005-07-24 18:40:00

In 1909, while harvesting a typical corn crop (Zea mays) in Illinois, a field worker noticed a plant so unusual that it was initially believed to be a new species. Its "peculiarly shaped ear" was "laid aside as a curiosity" and the specimen was designated Zea ramosa (from the Latin ramosus, "having many branches"). Due to the alteration of a single gene, later named ramosa1, both the ear and the tassel of the plant were more highly branched than usual, leading to loose, crooked kernel rows...


Latest Teosinte Reference Libraries

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2005-09-08 09:32:38

The larva of the moth Helicoverpa zea is a major agricultural pest for cotton (where it is known as the cotton bollworm), corn (where it is known as the corn earworm), tomatoes (where it is the tomato fruitworm), and many other crops. The adult moth, pictured here is a pollinator. It is very cosmopolitan in what plants it will use as larval food.

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Word of the Day
saggar
  • A ceramic container used inside a fuel-fired kiln to protect pots from the flame.
The word 'saggar' may come from 'safeguard'.
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