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Last updated on April 16, 2014 at 8:06 EDT

Latest terminal illness Stories

2008-07-21 06:00:42

PALLIATIVE care, which alleviates the symptoms of disease, usually in terminally ill patients, is the Cinderella of the health care system. For understandable and commendable reasons, modern hi- tech medicine has focused on curing disease, virtually regardless of cost. But sometimes this well-intentioned effort ignores the needs of the terminally ill and their families in the final stages of life. There comes a point when, as well as working to prolong life, it is just as important to prepare...

2008-07-19 00:00:37

Extra cash support means more terminally ill patients will be able to choose to die at home. Patient groups and relatives today welcomed the Government's pledge to invest pounds286m for palliative care services in Britain. The cash, earmarked for charities and health professionals, is intended to give more patients the choice to die in their own beds surrounded by their loved ones. Lincolnshire Primary Care Trust already has a pilot rapid- response team made up of teams of nurses...

2008-06-24 02:30:27

Can I appeal to any of your readers currently in training for the Swansea Bay 10k race to raise sponsorship for a local cause in need of funds. Marie Curie Cancer Care, which provides free home nursing care for the terminally ill, is celebrating its 60th anniversary this year. We are looking for up to 60 volunteers to run the race on our behalf. Every pounds20 raised will provide another hour of practical support for someone who is terminally ill, as well as family and friends. Taking...

2008-06-18 09:01:17

By Sarah Rothwell, Tampa Tribune, Fla. Jun. 18--UNIVERSITY AREA -- Bishop Bruce Wright is a source of hope and comfort to patients at University Community Hospital. As the hospital's chaplain, he shares in the celebration of births and grieves with families when a patient dies. He counsels the terminally ill and consoles the injured. Wright, 56, spends countless hours attending to the spiritual needs of men, women and children at UCH, UCH-Carrollwood, Pepin Heart Hospital and Helen Ellis...

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2008-06-16 09:10:00

One look at Eileen Mulligan lying soberly on the exam table, and Dr. John Marshall knew the time for the Big Talk had arrived. He began gently. The chemotherapy is not helping. The cancer is advanced. There are no good options left to try. It would be good to look into hospice care. "At first I was really shocked. But after, I thought it was a really good way of handling a situation like that," said Mulligan, who now is making a "bucket list" - things to do before she dies. Top priority:...

2008-06-15 15:00:00

By Tulsa World, Okla. Jun. 15--The physical and emotional toll of dealing with a loved one facing a terminal illness can prove crushing to even the most loving and patient of families and caregivers. One alternative is to turn to hospice care, which is asmuch for the family as for the patient. Hospice care is given usually to patients when they are expected to live six months or less. Whether in the home, a hospice center or nursing facility, the idea is to establish comfortable and...

2007-09-25 15:00:00

THE announcement last week by physician-assisted suicide advocates that they will start providing information to the terminally ill is the sad result of the state Legislatures failure to pass a needed law to help those in the final days of life. The End of Life Consultation Service does not plan to provide, nor administer, to a patient the means to die. Rather, it will provide advice on accessing pain treatment and end-of-life care. The group is approaching, but apparently trying not to...

2006-01-31 10:20:52

LONDON (Reuters) - Campaigners opposed to moves to legalise euthanasia said on Tuesday that Britain should be giving terminally ill patients better palliative care instead of considering how to kill them. The newly formed Care Not Killing Alliance said it would fight a euthanasia bill currently in the House of Lords and any other attempts to legalise doctor-assisted suicide. Human rights lawyer Lord Joffe has introduced a private bill that would give seriously ill patients the option...

2005-07-11 19:20:00

ST. Paul, Minn. "“ Contrary to what you might think, most people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are not depressed. They are also not more likely to get depressed as the end of life approaches, and they are not more likely to be depressed if they want to die or hasten their own death. Two new studies, published in the July 12 issue of Neurology, the scientific journal of the American Academy of Neurology, provide the evidence to contradict these assumptions. The two studies...

2005-06-26 18:41:15

A new project to help terminally ill Sikh and Muslim patients to have 'a good death' sensitive to their cultural and religious beliefs is to begin at the University of Edinburgh. The research -- the first in-depth study of its kind-- will aim to identify ways in which health professionals can better understand the palliative care needs of minorities and give patients the opportunity to die with dignity. The project will focus on Edinburgh, Lothian and Glasgow and will involve20-25 patients...