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Latest Terry Hughes Stories

2012-12-27 14:38:52

China´s coral reefs have suffered a devastating 80 per cent decline in recent decades, driven mainly by the country´s unrestrained economic development, according to a new international scientific study. The first comprehensive survey of the state of corals along mainland China and in the South China Sea reports a grim picture of decline, degradation and destruction resulting from coastal development, pollution and overfishing. A new study by Professor Terry Hughes and Matthew...

2012-11-26 14:15:23

Humans may be able to avert major environmental catastrophes that now loom if we learn to make better use of ℠borrowed time´, an eminent marine biologist will tell the Australian Academy of Science in Canberra tomorrow. “There is mounting evidence that we have already passed or may soon pass several critical boundaries affecting life on Earth, as well as our own future wellbeing,” the director of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook...

2012-04-12 21:05:44

As ocean temperatures rise, some species of corals are likely to succeed at the expense of others, according to a report published online on April 12 in the Cell Press journal Current Biology that details the first large-scale investigation of climate effects on corals. "The good news is that, rather than experiencing wholesale destruction, many coral reefs will survive climate change by changing the mix of coral species as the ocean warms and becomes more acidic," said Terry Hughes of...

2012-02-23 13:22:28

More than 300 eminent scientists from 21 other countries around the world today urged the Australian Federal Government to create the world´s largest no-take marine reserve in the Coral Sea. “Marine reserves are an important tool for managing and restoring ecosystems. They protect brood stocks for sustainable fisheries and rebuild distorted foodwebs. We know how well they work because of the differences that we observe again and again between different marine zones under...

2011-10-03 19:50:35

Australia should show a strong international lead in protecting the oceans and sea-life against overexploitation and other human impacts, a leading marine scientist says. In the lead up to the ℠Coral Reefs: Coast to Coast Symposium´ to be held in Fremantle, WA, on October 20-21, convener Professor Terry Hughes, the director of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University, is urging governments State and Federal to up Australia´s commitment to...

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2010-04-11 08:14:56

The skeptics who frequently deny the reality of climate change in the world's media lack all scientific credibility, charge three eminent Australian researchers who have just been listed among the world's 20 most influential scientists in the field of climate change. Marine researchers Professor Ove Hoegh-Guldberg, Professor Terry Hughes and Professor John Pandolfi were ranked in the world's top 20 by the international science citation analysts Thomson Reuters and ScienceWatch, for the decade...

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2009-11-16 15:34:30

To have even a chance of saving the world's coral reefs from extensive damage caused by global warming, carbon emissions in industrialized countries need to be cut by 25% below their year 2000 levels by 2020 "“ and by 80-90% by 2050. That is the uncompromising warning delivered today by some of Australia's most eminent marine and environmental scientists in a briefing to Australian Members of Parliament and Senators, in Parliament House, Canberra. "The Great Barrier Reef (GBR)...

2009-09-24 08:48:44

Humanity needs to act now to avoid threats to human well-being caused by irreversible damage to the Earth, its climate, species and life-supporting systems. Scientists say it has become essential to define what levels of such human-caused change are "Ëœsafe' and which are "Ëœunsafe', and to stay within these boundaries. The call comes from 28 of the world's most eminent environmental scientists, published today in the world's leading science journal, Nature. The...


Word of the Day
tesla
  • The unit of magnetic flux density in the International System of Units, equal to the magnitude of the magnetic field vector necessary to produce a force of one newton on a charge of one coulomb moving perpendicular to the direction of the magnetic field vector with a velocity of one meter per second. It is equivalent to one weber per square meter.
This word is named for Nikola Tesla, the inventor, engineer, and futurist.