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Last updated on April 16, 2014 at 11:21 EDT

Latest Testicular cancer Stories

2009-09-25 13:58:00

Higher levels of environmental chemicals in breast milk are linked to a higher incidence of testicular cancer, researchers in Denmark found. Konrad Krysiak-Baltyn and colleagues in Denmark, Finland and Germany measured levels of 121 chemicals in 68 breast milk samples from Denmark and Finland to compare exposure of mothers to environmental endocrine disrupting chemicals. There is a worldwide increase in testicular cancer, but the cause remains unknown, Krysiak-Baltyn said. In some...

2009-09-25 05:59:52

High levels of persistent environmental chemicals found in breast milk in a population with many male reproductive problems A comparison of breast milk samples from Denmark and Finland revealed a significant difference in environmental chemicals which have previously been implicated in testicular cancer or in adversely affecting development of the fetal testis in humans and animals. This finding is published Thursday (Sept. 24) in the International Journal of Andrology. In recent years a...

2009-06-29 10:53:06

Specific variations or mutations in a particular can gene raise a man's risk of familial, or inherited, testicular germ-cell cancer, the most common form of this disease, according to new research by scientists at the National Institutes of Health. This is only the second gene to be identified that affects the risk of familial testicular cancer, and the first gene in a key biochemical pathway. The study appears in the July 2009 Cancer Research.Researchers have suspected for years that...

2009-06-03 07:56:35

Scientists have discovered a genetic risk factor associated with a three-fold increase in risk for testicular cancer. The most common cancer among young men, rates of testicular cancer have doubled in the United States in the last 40 years, affecting seven out of 100,000 white men each year. Scientists have just discovered men with two copies of the common version of the c-KIT ligand gene have a 4.5-fold higher risk of testicular cancer than men who have copies of the less common version of...

2009-06-01 07:18:11

 Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine have uncovered variation around two genes that are associated with an increased risk of testicular cancer. Testicular cancer is the most common cancer among young men, and its incidence among non-Hispanic Caucasian men has doubled in the last 40 years -- it now affects seven out of 100,000 white men in the United States each year. The discovery, published in the May 31, 2009 online issue of Nature Genetics, is the first...

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2009-05-14 13:35:00

A new report has linked the use of chemicals found in food, cosmetics and cleaning products to an increased risk of birth defects, testicular cancer and infertility among unborn boys.Professor Richard Sharpe, a reproductive biologist of the Medical Research Council said the chemicals work to "feminize" male infants while still in the womb. The chemicals can block the male sex hormone testosterone, and even mimic the female hormone estrogen.Researchers point to birth defects seen on the penis,...

2009-03-18 11:43:18

The number of Canadians living with cancer is rising with the percentage higher in women than in men before age 60, government official said. However, the percentage of Canadians living with a diagnosis of cancer in men surpassed that for women at age 60 and older -- mostly because of prostate cancer in men. Statistics Canada reported the prevalence of most cancers increased with age -- exceptions were testicular cancer among men, cervical and thyroid cancer among women and Hodgkin lymphoma...

2009-02-24 08:22:18

Men who are infertile appear to have an increased risk of developing testicular cancer, according to a report in the February 23 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.Testicular germ cell cancer, the most common cancer among young men in industrialized countries, has become even more prevalent during the last 30 to 50 years, according to background information in the article. There is evidence that semen quality and male fertility have also declined during...

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2009-02-09 13:30:00

Long-term marijuana use may be linked to an increased risk of developing the most aggressive form of testicular cancer, US researchers reported on Monday. The team studied 369 Seattle-area men with testicular cancer who ranged in ages from 18 to 44 along with 979 men in of similar age who did not have testicular cancer. They found that those who currently smoke pot are 70 percent more likely to develop testicular cancer than those who do not. The risk was heightened among men who had...

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2008-11-20 09:11:42

Agents bind to different targets than conventional drugs A new class of compounds called phosphaplatins can effectively kill ovarian, testicular, head and neck cancer cells with potentially less toxicity than conventional drugs, according to a new study published this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The compounds could be less harmful than current cancer treatments on the market such as cisplatin and carboplatin because they don't penetrate the cell...