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Latest Testicular cancer Stories

2005-11-01 16:58:06

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - After treatment for testicular cancer, about 71 percent of men achieve fatherhood, new research indicates. However, the type of treatment has a strong impact on the paternity rate. The findings, which appear in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, are based on a study of 554 long-term survivors of testicular cancer who attempted to become fathers following treatment. Dr. Marianne Brydoy, from Haukeland University Hospital in Bergen, Norway, and...

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2005-09-21 17:00:00

NEW YORK -- Men like cyclist Lance Armstrong and comedian Tom Green who survived testicular cancer are at increased risk of developing other types of cancer for at least 35 years after being diagnosed with the original disease, a new analysis shows. The study also showed for the first time a greater risk of malignant mesothelioma, a cancer affecting the lining of the lungs, and esophagus cancer among testicular cancer survivors, likely due to the outdated practice of treating these patients...

2005-08-25 11:46:11

By Amy Norton NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Sperm banking may not only preserve young cancer patients' ability to have children, but their emotional well-being as well, according to Japanese researchers. They found that among 51 young men who banked their sperm before undergoing chemotherapy, 80 percent said that the move helped them in the "emotional battle against cancer." Even those who were unsure whether they wanted to have children in the future gained some peace of mind from...

2005-08-23 16:25:00

NEW YORK -- Pregnant women's weight is apparently associated with the subsequent risk of testicular cancer in male offspring once they become adults, according to a Scandinavian study. Higher maternal weight leads to higher levels of estrogens, which can be transferred from mother to fetus via the placenta. "Increased fetal exposure to estrogen during the first trimester of pregnancy has been proposed as a risk factor for the development of testicular cancer later in life," Dr. Tom...

2005-08-23 08:53:04

By Patrick Vignal PARIS (Reuters) - Seven-times Tour de France winner Lance Armstrong has denied ever taking performance-enhancing drugs following a report in French newspaper L'Equipe that he had used the blood-boosting drug EPO. Tour de France executive director Jean-Marie Leblanc said he felt let down by Armstrong after L'Equipe alleged the American had taken the banned drug in 1999, the year he first won the world's greatest cycle race. Armstrong, who recovered from testicular...

2005-08-23 07:46:39

By Patrick Vignal PARIS (Reuters) - Seven-times Tour de France winner Lance Armstrong has denied ever taking performance-enhancing drugs following a report in French newspaper L'Equipe that he used the blood-boosting drug EPO in 1999. Tour de France executive director Jean-Marie Leblanc said he felt let down by Armstrong after L'Equipe alleged the American had used the banned drug in 1999, the year he first won the world's greatest cycle race. Armstrong, who recovered from...

2005-07-22 20:27:29

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - After surgery, a single dose of carboplatin appears to be just as effective in preventing relapse as three weeks of radiation therapy in men with early-stage testicular cancer, according to the findings of a study published in this week's issue of The Lancet. Carboplatin also appears to be associated with less severe adverse effects and lower risk of developing a tumor in the other testicle. Although radiotherapy has long been the accepted treatment approach,...

2005-07-19 13:03:41

By Patricia Reaney LONDON (Reuters) - Most testicular cancer patients who try to father children after completing their treatment succeed, scientists said Tuesday. Men who have surgery to remove the tumour have the least problems but even patients who have radiotherapy and chemotherapy are able to have children. "The vast majority of men, after testicular cancer treatment, can go on and have a family as normal," said Dr Robert Huddart of The Institute of Cancer Research in London. But he...

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2005-06-30 08:06:15

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) -- Though testicular cancer remains relatively uncommon, rates of the disease have risen in many countries since the 1970s, a new study shows. Testicular cancer is known to be most common among white men, and worldwide, rates of the disease are still highest in the U.S., Canada, Australia and Europe -- particularly in Nordic countries such as Denmark and Norway. But researchers at National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Maryland, have found that rates of the disease...


Word of the Day
bodacious
  • Remarkable; prodigious.
  • Audacious; gutsy.
  • Completely; extremely.
  • Audaciously; boldly.
  • Impressively great in size; enormous; extraordinary.
This word is probably from the dialectal 'boldacious,' a blend of 'bold' and 'audacious.'
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