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Latest Testing effect Stories

2011-06-20 13:40:47

Picture a menacing drill sergeant, a gory slaughterhouse, a devastating scene of a natural disaster. Researchers at Washington University in St. Louis have found that viewing such emotion-laden images immediately after taking a test actually enhances people's retention of the tested material. The data the researchers gathered in recent studies are the first to show that negative arousal following successful retrieval of information enhances later recall of that information. The finding is...

2011-06-16 12:43:00

"We've known for over 100 years that testing is good for memory," says Kent State University psychology graduate student Kalif Vaughn. Psychologists have proven in a myriad of experiments that "retrieval practice""”correctly producing a studied item"”increases the likelihood that you'll get it right the next time. "But we didn't know why." In the past, many researchers have believed that testing is good for memory, but only for the exact thing you are trying to remember: so-called...

2011-02-10 13:43:33

Last week, the Orlando Sentinel newspaper reported that Palm Beach County, Fla., law enforcement is working to develop a consistent set of rules for eyewitnesses, hoping it will help prevent false convictions. And a new Iowa State University study published in the Journal of Experimental Psychology finds that there may be good reason to question the recall of some eyewitnesses. The study summarizes two experiments conducted by Jason Chan, an ISU assistant professor of psychology; and Moses...


Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
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