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Latest Tettigoniidae Stories

2013-12-05 10:23:28

Attracting katydid females in the presence of a masking sound As darkness descends upon the tropical rainforests of Malaysia, male chirping katydids of the Mecopoda complex are just getting warmed up for their usual nightly concerts to woo the females. These nocturnal suitors are favoured for chirping in synchrony as a chorus; however, singing in time with one another is no easy task as they have to co-ordinate in the presence of the noisy serenades from a very closely related katydid...

Chirp Of A Rare Bushcricket Is As Loud As A Power Saw
2013-07-23 14:56:24

AlphaGalileo Foundation A recently rediscovered species of bushcricket uses elastic energy and wing movement to reach high ultrasonic frequencies involving sound levels of about 110dB -- comparable to that of a power saw. The reason for a bushcricket species' unusually loud and ultra-high frequency calling song has been detailed in a new paper. Ben Chivers, who is studying animal behavior at the University of Lincoln, UK, co-authored the paper which illustrates the process in which...

Tiny Grasshopper-like Insect Found Roaming Around In Belize
2012-02-16 08:27:52

Entomologists from the University of Illinois have discovered a new species of grasshopper-like insect in the tropical rainforests of Belize, apparently the first of its family to be found, naming it in commemoration of an ancient Mayan people who once lived in the region. The tiny hopper, Ripipteryx mopana, was discovered in the Toledo District in Belize. It was named after a tribe of Mayans known as the Mopan people. R. mopana measures less than 0.2 inches (5mm) long and is the...

Researchers Recreate Fossil Cricket Love Song
2012-02-07 10:11:18

[ Listen to the Recreation ] An international team of scientists took it upon themselves to recreate the love song of an extinct cricket that lived more than 160 million years ago during the Jurassic Period. The song was reconstructed using microscopic wing features on a fossilized bush cricket (Archaboilus musicus) found in northeast China. The call of the Jurassic cricket was simple, pure and capable of traveling long distances in the night, scientists noted. The reproduced sounds...

Image 1 - Ancient Crickets Hint At The Origins Of Insect Hearing
2012-01-04 04:53:04

How did insects get their hearing? A new study of 50 million year-old cricket and katydid fossils – sporting some of the best preserved fossil insect ears described to date– help trace the evolution of the insect ear, says a new study by researchers working at the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center. Insects hear with help from unusual ears, said co-author Roy Plotnick of the University of Illinois at Chicago. Grasshoppers have ears on their abdomens. Lacewings have ears on...

Female Mate Searching Evolves When Mating Gifts Are Important
2011-09-28 12:34:39

In the animal world, males typically search for their female partners. The mystery is that in some species, you get a reversal -- the females search for males. A new study of katydids in the latest issue of the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B -- co-authored by University of Toronto Mississauga professor Darryl Gwynne -- supports a theory that females will search if males offer a lot more than just sperm. "In this beast [in this study], it's a big cheesy, gooey substance that...

2009-07-29 14:49:09

An official with the Ohio Department of Wildlife said a rare pink katydid that was slated to go on display at the Ohio State Fair has been killed by a wasp. Jim McCormac of the Ohio Division of Wildlife said the katydid, discovered July 19 at the Killdeer Plains Wildlife Area in Wyandot County and slated to go on display at a fair, which began Wednesday, was killed after a parasitic wasp injected its eggs into the insect and the offspring ate their way out, The Columbus (Ohio) Dispatch...

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2009-07-28 16:05:00

Armored crickets have a strange yet remarkable way of defending themselves from being attacked, squirting out toxic blood from tiny gaps in their body and then throwing up to make themselves unpalatable to predators.While a few other insect species, such as beetles and katydids, actively bleed when attacked, the benefits of such extreme measures were not clear. New research shows the strategy does indeed work in deterring predators such as lizards.  Armored ground crickets (Acanthoplus...

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2009-07-24 14:35:00

A woman from Mansfield, Ohio, says she came across a rare pink katydid while trekking through the Killdeer Plains Wildlife Area. Mansfield resident Jan Kennedy said finding the pink cricket-like creature, which are typically green, in Wyandot County, Ohio, was a unique treat, The Columbus (Ohio) Dispatch said Friday. It was like finding a new toy, Kennedy said of the katydid, which she affectionately named Pinky. To me, it's a total treasure hunt. Kennedy's friend, Cheryl Harner, also pointed...

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2008-03-11 17:43:08

MU study determines flexible mating calls may contribute to ecological success of species COLUMBIA, Mo. "“ Katydid (or didn't she?) respond to the mating call of her suitors. According to scientists at the University of Missouri, one species of katydid may owe its ecological success and expanded habitat range to the ability of male katydids to adjust their mating calls to attract females. Males of the katydid species Neoconocephalus triops, which can be found from Peru to Missouri,...


Latest Tettigoniidae Reference Libraries

0_3aacb3c5a030a33a1072fa539051707d
2005-09-07 18:59:19

Katydid is the common name of insects belonging to the grasshopper family Tettigoniidae, which contains over 6,800 species. Katydid are also known as "long horned grasshoppers" and "bush crickets." The term "katydid" is used mainly in the U.S., Canada, and Australia. The name "katydid" comes from the sound produced by species of the N. American genus Pterophylla (literally "winged leaf"). The males of katydids have sound-producing (stridulating) organs located on their front wings which in...

40_679a7120a90bc3449a6ecb669210fe98
2005-08-25 09:40:19

The Orthoptera are an order of insects with incomplete metamorphosis, including the grasshoppers, crickets, locusts, and katydids. Many insects in this order produce sound (known as stridulation) by rubbing their wings against each other or their legs, the wings or legs containing rows of corrugated bumps. Their ears, located in the front legs, are interconnected in such a way that they are able to locate each other by sound. Characteristics Orthopterans have two pairs of wings - the...

0_80b600c3cd3494e8a4c494affbdaba4d
2005-07-13 16:57:18

Crickets, family Gryllidae (also known as "true crickets"), are insects related to grasshoppers and katydids (order Orthoptera). They have somewhat flattened bodies and long antennae. Crickets are known for the loud chirping noises they make by rubbing their wings together. Only male crickets sing as the male wings have ridges that act like a "comb and file" that produces a song that is species specific. Interestingly in 1970, Dr. William H. Cade discovered that the parasitic fly Ormia...

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Word of the Day
monteith
  • A large punch-bowl of the eighteenth century, usually of silver and with a movable rim, and decorated with flutings and a scalloped edge. It was also used for cooling and carrying wine-glasses.
  • A kind of cotton handkerchief having white spots on a colored ground, the spots being produced by a chemical which discharges the color.
This word is possibly named after Monteith (Monteigh), 'an eccentric 17th-century Scotsman who wore a cloak scalloped at the hem.'
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