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Latest Texas AgriLife Research Stories

Certain Fruits Can Fight Against Obesity
2012-06-19 08:51:04

Connie K. Ho for redOrbit.com Walking in the aisle of a produce section of a supermarket, you´ll be bombarded by a variety of fragrant smells and bright colors. With so many choices these days, it can be quite difficult to pick out the best healthy fruits and veggies. Luckily, a new study points to fruits that have beneficial qualities. Texas AgriLife Research recently discovered that peaches, plums, and nectarines have bioactive compounds that can possibly stave off obesity-related...

2012-03-14 09:46:58

AgriLife Research scientists develop new, more accurate technique for determining age of white-tailed deer Researchers at the Texas AgriLife Research and Extension Center in Uvalde have developed a more accurate technique than traditional methods for estimating the age of white-tailed bucks, said a Texas AgriLife Research scientist at the center. "South Texas is famous for producing trophy white-tailed deer," said Dr. Susan Cooper, AgriLife Research associate professor and lead...

2012-02-17 15:00:00

Focal points are improved yield, quality and stress tolerance Monheim, Germany (PRWEB) February 17, 2012 Bayer CropScience and Texas AgriLife Research, a part of the Texas A&M University System, College Station, Texas, USA have signed a multi-year agreement to develop and commercialize improved wheat varieties. Utilizing Texas AgriLife Research´s extensive collection of wheat cultivars and germplasm and Bayer´s expertise in both classical and molecular plant breeding, the...

2011-12-13 11:50:40

At least one person admits that the extreme heat in Texas this year was beneficial. But all the same, he'd opt next time for a handmade torture chamber. "Some people will complain about the heat, but from my viewpoint as a breeder, I love stress," said Dr. David Byrne, Texas AgriLife Research rose breeder. With maximum mean highs of 107 degrees for weeks near Mansfield and 104 at College Station, where Byrne has research plots, numerous rose varieties were put to one of Mother...

2011-09-27 14:31:43

Texas AgriLife Research discovery announced A sorghum hybrid that does not flower and accumulates as much as three times the amount of stem and leaf matter may help the bioenergy industry, according to a study appearing today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. A team at Texas AgriLife Research has discovered a gene that regulates sorghum flowering, according to the proceedings. "For energy crops, we want to prevent plants from flowering so they accumulate as much...

Image 1 - Scientists Making Better Melons
2011-09-20 10:24:22

  Drought heats up further interest on tolerant crop With the extended statewide dry spell, researchers at the Texas AgriLife Research and Extension Center in Uvalde and elsewhere have been focusing their attention on improving varieties of more drought-tolerant crops, particularly melons, said the center´s administrator. “We´re looking into improved varieties of melons, such as cantaloupe and honeydew, and are growing and assessing some Spanish and Italian...

2011-07-25 23:40:05

Around the globe, many nations are realizing that the potential for bioterrorism isn't just about the U.S., officials say. And because an intentional introduction of bacteria, a virus or a toxin could happen anywhere, the World Organization for Animal Health is issuing a paper aimed at prevention. "Any emerging country that is beginning to think about maintaining international trade needs to be aware of the potential for bioterrorism," said Dr. Neville Clarke, special assistant to the Texas...

2011-07-07 00:48:37

Just as corn and peanuts stunned the world decades ago with their then-newly discovered multi-beneficial uses and applications, Texas AgriLife Research scientists in Corpus Christi think microalgae holds even more promise. "It's a huge, untapped source of fuel, food, feed, pharmaceuticals and even pollution-busters," said Dr. Carlos Fernandez, a crop physiologist at the Texas AgriLife Research and Extension Center at Corpus Christi who is studying the physiological responses of microalgae to...

2011-06-27 12:38:02

As billion-dollar agricultural losses continue to mount in the withering Texas heat, Texas AgriLife Research scientists in Corpus Christi are taking a closer look at why some cotton varieties do better than others in drought conditions. "We want to better understand those traits that control water use in plants so we can transfer that information to breeders and geneticists to more quickly develop drought-tolerant cultivars so badly needed here," said Dr. Carlos Fernandez, a plant...

2010-12-07 13:46:22

Method could result in safer, more nutritious fresh produce A team of Texas AgriLife Research engineers has developed a way to cut by as much as half the amount of irradiation needed to kill 99.999 percent of salmonella, E. coli and other pathogens on fresh produce. By packing produce in a Mylar bag filled with pure oxygen, Dr. Carmen Gomes, AgriLife Research food safety engineer, and her colleagues found they could significantly reduce the amount of radiation needed to kill those pathogens....