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Latest TGF beta Stories

2010-12-31 12:21:01

(Ivanhoe Newswire) "“ Many mechanisms change the activity of genes. Epigenetics determine when genes are turned on and off, and these epigenetics allow for cells to become cancerous. This was especially seen in ovarian cancer. Researchers at the Duke Cancer Institute have found evidence of epigenetics at work on a genome-wide scale in cases of ovarian cancer. One major biological signaling pathway in particular was found to contain many genes influenced by DNA methylation, a mechanism...

2010-12-14 14:55:49

Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death among gynecological cancers. To better understand the disease and improve therapies, researchers are investigating how deregulation of genes across the genome could be contributing to malignancy. In a study published online today in Genome Research (www.genome.org), scientists have identified age-related gene-specific accumulation of DNA methylation that suppresses a critical cellular pathway contributing to ovarian carcinogenesis, information that...

2010-12-14 14:36:37

There are many mechanisms that alter the activity of genes "“ direct changes to the DNA code like mutations and deletions, or changes that control when genes are switched on and off, called epigenetic means. Tumor-suppressor genes are often inactivated through epigenetics, which provides an opening for the cancerous growth of cells. Researchers at the Duke Cancer Institute have found evidence of epigenetics at work on a genome-wide scale in cases of ovarian cancer. One major biological...

2010-09-20 22:40:41

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists uncover a novel pathway for regulating T lymphocytes that play very different roles in inflammation; mechanism offers a promising target for new drugs against autoimmune disorders St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have identified a new pathway that helps control the immune balance through reciprocal regulation of specialized T ymphocytes, which play very different inflammatory roles. Investigators also determined that two drugs...

2010-06-15 15:17:15

Oncogenes are like friends who've gone off the deep end. Normally steady, reliable members of the cellular workforce, these genes become very bad influences when mutated or expressed at high levels -- urging a cell to divide uncontrollably and become cancerous. Now scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine and the University of Wuerzburg, Germany, have deciphered a part of the pathway used by a well-known oncogene called Myc to exert its malignant effect. Their findings confirm...

2010-06-10 15:28:14

Several years ago, Dr. Arthur Beaudet, Baylor College of Medicine's chair of molecular and human genetics, was surprised to find that mice that lacked a protein called E-selectin ligand-1 were shorter than normal. He and his colleagues were hoping that the protein was involved in cell adherence, but instead their mice had a form of dwarfism. They turned the mice and their data over to Dr. Brendan Lee, a professor of molecular and human genetics at BCM, and an expert in the development of...

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2010-04-28 09:02:09

Animal study suggests new target that might help aid recovery for patients with traumatic injuries A protein called fibrinogen that is known to help form blood clots also triggers scar formation in the brain and spinal cord, according to new research in the April 28 issue of the Journal of Neuroscience. Researchers found that fibrinogen carries a dormant factor that activates when it enters the brain after an injury, prompting brain cells to form a scar. Scars in the brain or spinal cord can...

2010-04-20 14:22:50

By examining tissue removed during breast reduction surgery in healthy women, researchers at Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Center have found a molecule they say identified women who had atypical hyperplasia, a potentially precancerous condition in which cells are abnormally increased. Their findings, presented at the AACR 101st Annual Meeting 2010, suggest that this protein, transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-ÃŽ²1), could be part of a panel of genes and proteins that...

2009-12-06 13:53:33

TGFb growth factor controls spread of cancer cells The spread, or metastasis, of individual breast cancer cells from the main tumor into the blood circulation to the lungs and other body tissues and organs is under the control of a growth factor abbreviated TGFb, according to a study with laboratory mice that will be presented at the American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB) 49th Annual Meeting, Dec. 5-9, 2009 in San Diego. These messenger genes may be a promising target for drugs to block the...

2009-12-02 11:24:48

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have found that a naturally occurring protein "” transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-ß1) "” which normally suppresses the growth of cancer cells, causes a rebound effect after a prolonged exposure. Cancer cells go into overdrive and become even more aggressive and likely to spread, the researchers report. The mechanism for this reversal is unknown, but UT Southwestern researchers and their colleagues in...