Quantcast

Latest the Journal of Clinical Investigation Stories

2013-09-23 11:29:58

This discovery gives hope for a more effective and cheaper treatment strategy to millions worldwide suffering from chronic infections A recent discovery by scientists at A*STAR’s Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences (SICS), in close collaboration with researchers at the Singapore Immunology Network (SIgN), provides hope for a new personalized treatment strategy that could use a patient’s own blood to treat the infection. This could help treat millions of people living with chronic...

2012-08-28 11:30:54

High doses of vitamin B3 enhance immune system's infection-fighting ability, study shows Cedars-Sinai researchers have found that a common vitamin may have the potential to provide a powerful weapon to fight certain "superbugs," antibiotic-resistant staph infections that health experts see as a threat to public health. The research, published in the September 2012 edition of The Journal of Clinical Investigation, found that high doses of the nicotinamide form of vitamin B3 stimulated a...

2012-08-07 07:36:19

Researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) are the first to discover that changes in monocytes (a type of white blood cell) are a biomarker for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or Lou Gehrig's disease. This finding also brings the medical community a step closer toward a new treatment for the debilitating neurological disease that affects approximately 30,000 Americans. The study will be published online in The Journal of Clinical Investigation on August 6, 2012. In...

2011-09-19 22:57:55

If the brain goes hungry, Twinkies look a lot better, a study led by researchers at Yale University and the University of Southern California has found. Brain imaging scans show that when glucose levels drop, an area of the brain known to regulate emotions and impulses loses the ability to dampen desire for high-calorie food, according to the study published online September 19 in The Journal of Clinical Investigation. "Our prefrontal cortex is a sucker for glucose," said Rajita Sinha,...

e822233d470fceac481d8d7b654bc2261
2011-01-26 10:27:43

By Caroline Arbanas, Washington University in St. Louis Widespread vascular tumors, massive hemorrhage and death reported in mice A study by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has raised safety concerns about an investigational approach to treating cancer. The strategy takes aim at a key signaling pathway, called Notch, involved in forming new blood vessels that feed tumor growth. When researchers targeted the Notch1 signaling pathway in mice, the animals...

2011-01-05 14:20:40

Scientists at Inserm and Institut Pasteur have performed biomarker discovery on patients being treated for chronic hepatitis C infection. Their work, published in The Journal of Clinical Investigation, demonstrates that the plasma levels of the protein IP-10 predict, prior to treatment initiation, the efficacy of treatment with pegylated-interferon and ribavirin. Based on these results, the scientists have developed a prognostic test. Commercialization is anticipated in 2011, and will help...

2010-11-01 17:18:30

A protein called T-cadherin docks the fat hormone adiponectin to the heart, where it guards against stress-induced damage One of the many advantages of maintaining a normal body weight is having healthy fat, which in turn supports a healthy heart. Fat tissue is increasingly seen as more than just a storage depot "“ it's also an active secretory organ that normally produces high levels of a cardioprotective hormone called adiponectin. How adiponectin protects the hearts of healthy people...

2010-08-26 12:21:06

Research paves way for new liver disease research and possibly cell-based therapy By creating diseased liver cells from a small sample of human skin, scientists have for the first time shown that stem cells can be used to model a diverse range of inherited disorders. The University of Cambridge researchers' findings, which will hopefully lead to new treatments for those suffering from liver diseases, were published today in The Journal of Clinical Investigation. Because liver cells...

2010-06-07 16:34:20

Substance in iron metabolism displays life-saving potential for inflammatory diseases In a surprising discovery that someday may lead to new treatments for many inflammatory diseases, University of Utah scientists found that a hormone involved in iron metabolism can save mice from deadly acute inflammation. "It's well recognized that the hormone hepcidin helps regulate iron balance. This study shows it has an additional, brand-new, unexpected role in reducing inflammation," says the study's...

2009-12-02 11:24:48

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have found that a naturally occurring protein "” transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-ß1) "” which normally suppresses the growth of cancer cells, causes a rebound effect after a prolonged exposure. Cancer cells go into overdrive and become even more aggressive and likely to spread, the researchers report. The mechanism for this reversal is unknown, but UT Southwestern researchers and their colleagues in...


Word of the Day
reremouse
  • A bat.
The word 'reremouse' comes from Middle English reremous, from Old English hrēremūs, hrērmūs ("bat"), equivalent to rear (“to move, shake, stir”) +‎ mouse.
Related