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Latest the Journal of Neuroscience Stories

2011-05-05 15:34:31

When a group of gamblers gather around a roulette table, individual players are likely to have different reasons for betting on certain numbers. Some may play a "lucky" number that has given them positive results in the past"”a strategy called reinforcement learning. Others may check out the recent history of winning colors or numbers to try and decipher a pattern. Betting on the belief that a certain outcome is "due" based on past events is called the gambler's fallacy. Recently,...

2011-04-13 15:30:04

The hormone ghrelin, known to promote hunger and fat storage, has been found to enhance exploratory "sniffing" in both animals and humans. The research, by University of Cincinnati (UC) scientists, suggests that ghrelin may be designed to boost detection of calories in our environment through smell and link those inputs with natural regulation of metabolism and body weight. Led by Jenny Tong, MD, and Matthias Tschöp, MD, both of UC's endocrinology, diabetes and metabolism division, the...

2011-01-07 18:40:55

New findings could lead to new treatments for the 95 percent of Parkinson's cases with no known cause Just 5 percent of Parkinson's disease cases can be explained by genetic mutation, while the rest have no known cause. But a new discovery by researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center may begin to explain why the vast majority of Parkinson's patients develop the progressive neurodegenerative disease. This week in The Journal of Neuroscience, the researchers demystified a...

2010-12-17 17:20:02

University at Buffalo neuroscience researchers conducting basic research on ion channels have demonstrated a process that could have a profound therapeutic impact on pain. Targeting these ion channels pharmacologically would offer effective pain relief without generating the side effects of typical painkilling drugs, according to their paper, published in a recent issue of The Journal of Neuroscience. "Pain is the most common symptom of injuries and diseases, and pain remains the primary...

2010-12-16 14:54:06

APOE4 genotype linked to functional changes prior to formation of senile plaques People with a known, high risk for Alzheimer's disease develop abnormal brain function even before the appearance of telltale amyloid plaques that are characteristic of the disease, according to a new study. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis report in the Dec. 15 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience that these patients had a particular form of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene...

2010-12-15 14:27:54

Study shows sensory feedback gives monkeys better control of computer cursors Monkeys moved thought-controlled computer cursors more quickly and accurately when provided with additional sensory feedback, according to a new study in the Dec. 15 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience. While most brain-machine technologies rely only on visual feedback, this study demonstrated that these systems can be improved when users have additional input, such as a sense of the arm's position and motion, a...

2010-12-01 12:38:17

Animal study shows exposure to stress after dieting increases binge eating Stressed-out mice with a history of dieting ate more high-fat foods than similarly stressed mice not previously on diets, according to a new study in the Dec. 1 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience. The findings suggest that moderate diets change how the brain responds to stress and may make crash dieters more susceptible to weight gain. In this study, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania led by Tracy Bale,...

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2010-12-01 09:54:49

By Jim Dryden, Washington University School of Medicine Study has implications for testing new drugs Neuroscientists using a new brain imaging technique could see an investigational drug for Parkinson's disease get into a patient's brain and affect blood flow in several key structures, an indicator the drug may be effective. The study represents the first use of the technique in humans "” called perfusion MRI "” to test a drug still in development, the lead investigator says. In...

2010-10-29 09:41:43

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- The brain can process sensory information in a fraction of a second, but in special cases it can be processed quicker.  A recent study from the Journal of Neuroscience found that those who are born blind can process tactile signals quicker than those with unimpaired vision. Daniel Goldreich, PhD and his research team at McMaster University tested the tactile aptitude of 89 non-blind subjects against 57 vision-impaired subjects by tapping each individual's index...

2010-10-13 13:55:54

Unlike humans, honey bees, when thrown into highly time-altered new societal roles, are able to alter their biological rhythms with alacrity, enabling them to make a successful "quick switch" in their daily routines, according to research carried out at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. With people, on the other hand, disturbances to their biological clocks by drastic changes in their daily schedules are known to cause problems -- for example for shift workers and for new parents of crying,...


Word of the Day
bibliopole
  • A bookseller; now, especially, a dealer in rare and curious books.
This word comes from a Greek phrase meaning 'book seller.'
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