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Latest the Journal of Neuroscience Stories

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2010-10-13 11:06:41

People's brains are more responsive to friends than to strangers, even if the stranger has more in common, according to a study in the Oct. 13 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience. Researchers examined a brain region known to be involved in processing social information, and the results suggest that social alliances outweigh shared interests. In a study led by graduate student Fenna Krienen and senior author Randy Buckner, PhD, of Harvard University, researchers investigated how the medial...

2010-09-30 16:54:39

New research provides evidence of the vicious cycle created when an obese individual overeats to compensate for reduced pleasure from food. Obese individuals have fewer pleasure receptors and overeat to compensate, according to a study by University of Texas at Austin senior research fellow and Oregon Research Institute senior scientist Eric Stice and his colleagues published this week in The Journal of Neuroscience. Stice shows evidence this overeating may further weaken the responsiveness...

2010-09-16 17:07:05

Elevated levels of a growth protein in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients is linked to impaired neurogenesis, the process by which new neurons are generated, say researchers at the University of California, San Diego in today's edition of The Journal of Neuroscience. Eliezer Masliah, MD, professor of neurosciences and pathology in the UC San Diego School of Medicine and colleagues report that increased levels of BMP6 "“ part of a family of bone morphogenetic proteins...

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2010-09-15 09:56:46

Study suggests honey bees' circadian rhythms depend on contact with young Honey bees removed from their usual roles in the hive quickly and drastically changed their biological rhythms, according to a study in the Sept. 15 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience. The changes were evident in both the bees' behavior and in their internal clocks. These findings indicate that social environment has a significant effect on the physiology and behavior of animals. In people, disturbances to the...

2010-08-04 14:34:23

Cocaine-associated 'cues' less likely to lead to relapse with behavioral therapy and memory drug, animal study suggests A memory-boosting medication paired with behavioral therapy might help addicts stay clean, according to new animal research in the Aug. 4 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience. The study suggests D-cycloserine, previously used in the lab to treat fear and anxiety disorders, could help an addict resist drugs even when confronted with drug-related cues outside of rehab....

2010-06-02 15:43:53

Brain research suggests Chinese-speaking adults reading English recall the sound of Chinese translations Adults fluent in English whose first language is Chinese retrieve their native language when reading in English, according to new research in the June 2 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience. This study suggests that people who learn a second language in adolescence or later recall the sounds of words from their native language. The scientists who conducted the study, Yan Jing Wu, PhD, and...

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2010-05-05 07:55:34

Study finds severe gamblers show greater response in brain regions associated with reward The brains of problem gamblers react more intensely to "near misses" than casual gamblers, possibly spurring them on to play more, according to new research in the May 5 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience. The researchers found the brain region that responds to rewards by delivering a dose of the chemical dopamine was especially active in these individuals. Studies have shown that pathological gambling...

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2010-04-28 09:02:09

Animal study suggests new target that might help aid recovery for patients with traumatic injuries A protein called fibrinogen that is known to help form blood clots also triggers scar formation in the brain and spinal cord, according to new research in the April 28 issue of the Journal of Neuroscience. Researchers found that fibrinogen carries a dormant factor that activates when it enters the brain after an injury, prompting brain cells to form a scar. Scars in the brain or spinal cord can...

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2010-04-14 09:30:02

Animal study suggests a mutated protein in brain cells can lead to cardiac arrest in people with epilepsy A mutation in a brain protein gene may trigger irregular heart beat and sudden death in people with epilepsy, according to new research in the April 14 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience. People with epilepsy who are otherwise healthy are more than 10 times more likely to die suddenly and unexpectedly than the general population. Researchers have long suspected that abnormal ion...

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2010-03-24 08:21:37

Animal study furthers our understanding of inherited neurodegenerative disease New research shows how a mutation causes a common inherited neurodegenerative disease, according to a study in the March 24 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience. The study shows that the mutation of a specific protein known to cause Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disrupts the movement of mitochondria, the energy-supplying machines inside each cell. The regulated movement of mitochondria along nerve cell fibers is vital...